New recipes

Put One of These Party Hats on Your Cat and Stand Back

Put One of These Party Hats on Your Cat and Stand Back

iStock

Happy birthday to this sweet cat!

There’s nothing quite like getting dressed up for a party. Whether you’re celebrating a birthday, an anniversary, or just want to celebrate Sunday with a boozy brunch, dressing well makes you feel good and look festive. But looking good shouldn’t just be limited to humans, oh no — your cats need to be fancy, too.

Yeah. We’re talking about dressing up your cat. Be it for human party or a feline fête, make sure your furry friend is stylin’ with one of these five fun party hats from Etsy.

Jane Austen Bonnet
Whether you’re hosting a tea party or just want your cat to have a fancy Pride and Prejudice birthday party, this festive, classy bonnet is sure to keep your kitty looking prim and proper.

Ice Cream Scoop Hat
I scream, you scream, and your cat screams (meows) for this ice cream scoop hat. If you’re celebrating your kitty’s b-day with an ice cream social and saucers of milk, let your pet be the most festive feline in the pack with this foodie cap.

Orange and Green Knit Hat
Want your cat to look like a carrot, perhaps for a Halloween party? This simple hat with a poofy green top will get the job done. The ties secured to the bottom of your buddy’s chin are likely to keep this chapeau more secure.

Party Hat
Sometimes, you just want to party with a little glitz between your ears, and cats are no different. This shimmering, sparkling glitter party hat is the best way to say, “It’s my day, not yours.”

Unicorn Hood
There’s a massive unicorn food trend, so why not start a unicorn pet phase? Sure, the horned, rainbow-tinted horse may be mythical. But cats, and this unicorn hat, are very real.


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."


Does Your Cat Have Whisker Fatigue?

Plus, why it may explain visible signs of your pet's stress and agitation.

While Kitty&aposs whiskers add to her cuteness, they also serve a physiological purpose. "Your cats&apos whiskers are definitely a more complex organ than they may appear to be," explains Dr. Jesus Aramendi, senior veterinarian at Chewy. "Cat whiskers, also known as vibrissae, are not just a set of long thick hairs attached to their cheeks. These hairs have the functionality to act as a sensory organ to aid your cat in understanding their surroundings in dim light, orienting themselves in tight spaces, and even detecting changes in air currents which alert them of movements."

While it can be tempting to touch your cat&aposs whiskers in petting, you should not touch them often, if at all𠅍oing so can harm a cat&aposs spacial understanding her world. "Simply put, whisker fatigue seems to be an overstimulation of the sensory system of the whiskers," says Dr. Aramendi. "When the whiskers are touched too much, even if it is basic brushing against food and water dishes, or against furniture in the house, the cat&aposs brain will receive an overstimulation message from the whiskers, possibly making them feel stressed or agitated."