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Say Hello To a Better Night’s Rest With the Sense Sleep Tracker

Say Hello To a Better Night’s Rest With the Sense Sleep Tracker

There are few better feelings than waking up well-rested and ready to take on the world. Unfortunately, that euphoria doesn’t happen regularly for most people (read: alarm clocks suck). Thankfully Hello has created a “sleeping pill” called Sense that not only promises a better night’s rest, but also tracks your sleep behavior and the environment of your room, and will also wake you up at the precise moment that works best for your body. It comes with a little, unobtrusive device that attaches to your pillow to collect data on your behavior and the environment (including noise and light disturbances) as you sleep.Then Sense will wake you up at the opportune time during your sleep cycle. For those who are a little Type-A and love being the best, Sense also gives you a grade after every night’s rest, so you can monitor its effectiveness as it monitors you overnight.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.


The Best Lighting, Bedding, and Sleep Products for a Better Night's Rest

You hear it all the time, in study after study: Sleep is critical to your health, energy levels, memory, mood, and metabolism. (Basically, sleep is life.) And there have never been more high-tech wellness products touting abilities to track, encourage, and/or enhance our shut-eye. Yet just 49 percent of people feel satisfied with their sleep, according to a 2020 Philips Global Sleep Survey of more than 13,000 adults. What’s still standing between us and our pillows? “Good sleep is like a puzzle,” says pulmonologist and sleep expert Raj Dasgupta, MD, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California. “Often, there’s one missing puzzle piece, and you’ve got to figure out what that is. It could be the sound or temperature in your home, the lighting, or the comfort of your bed.” The first step in ID’ing the missing piece(s) of your sleep puzzle is checking out this roundup of products that leading sleep experts swear by𠅏or both their patients and themselves.

Different wavelengths of light help regulate our circadian rhythm, or sleep/wake cycle. By day, we need plenty of the blue wavelength found in natural sunlight and bright light bulbs this keeps us alert by suppressing the release of the sleep hormone melatonin. As evening approaches and the sun begins going down, we can cue melatonin release by mirroring that gradual dimming effect in our homes. “Light is a stimulant that tells your brain it’s daytime, so if you continue to see light well into the evening and before sleep, the brain stays alert, and that causes problems with falling asleep,” says Steven Lockley, PhD, a Harvard Medical School neuroscientist who researches sleep and circadian disorders. “Light also has a half-life, much like caffeine, where its effects carry on after exposure, so the light you see before bedtime will affect your sleep for at least a couple of hours and also impact how deeply you sleep.” If you tend to gaze at a smartphone or tablet in the hours before bed, use the blue-light filter or put your device in night mode, which reduces blue light for TV watching, put on a pair of blue-light-blocking glasses. Once you’re under the covers, aim for total darkness (blackout shades are helpful) even a night-light or bright alarm clock can disrupt your sleep cycle. �use they’re bright spots in the darkness, you can often see them even with your eyes closed,” Lockley says. Here are some highlights in sleep-enhancing light technology.