New recipes

‘Food & Wine’ recognizes pastry chefs

‘Food & Wine’ recognizes pastry chefs

Food & Wine magazine has expanded its “Best New Chefs” franchise with the addition of pastry chefs.

The magazine’s first roster of winners, selected by its editors, are:

• Shawn Gawle of Corton in New York City

• Bryce Caron of Blackbird in Chicago

• Laura Sawicki of La Condesa in Austin, Texas

• Stella Parks of Table 310 in Lexington, Ky.

• Devin McDavid of Quince and Cotogna in San Francisco

The magazine also named Chris Ford of Wit & Wisdom in Baltimore the People’s Best New Pastry Chef award, following an online poll.

The award, similar to Food & Wine’s Best New Chefs awards, is open to professionals who have run a restaurant pastry kitchen for five years or less.

Those awards have helped bring fame to a wide array of chefs whose names are now household words among food enthusiasts.

Past winners include Rick Bayless, Thomas Keller, Daniel Boulud, David Bouley, Nobu Matsuhisa, Todd English, Tom Colicchio, Grant Achatz and David Chang.

Contact Bret Thorn at [email protected]
Follow him on Twitter: @foodwriterdiary


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

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Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more


T.O. pastry chef Camilla Wynne shares her pro tips on preserves — and her popular recipe for cherry negroni jam

For Toronto-based pastry chef Camilla Wynne, creating preserves feels like making an investment in the future. “It’s a great way to connect to your local food, get creative and make something that can stay in your pantry for a long time,” explains Wynne, who previously worked at the Drake Hotel in Toronto. “Then, when you’re in the depths of winter and can hardly remember what a local strawberry is like, you have them on hand.”

Wynne grew up eating her grandmothers’ homemade preserves — orange marmalade would be her desert-island pick — and taught herself how to make her own when she realized store-bought options would never compare. Wanting to learn the science of jam-making, she took a master preserver program stateside, making her one of the only people in Canada with that qualification.

As it turns out, when you become an official jam expert, people keep asking for tips. So Wynne put all her advice in her new book, “Jam Bake: Inspired Recipes for Creating and Baking with Preserves.” Out on June 1, it details recipes for surprising jams (like apricot with cocoa nibs) and desserts to enjoy with them (fudgy brownies, for example).

Ultimately, Wynne wants us to remember that jam isn’t just for morning toast. Here are three other ways to make use of it.

Add gooey layers in between treats. New to incorporating preserves in desserts? There’s no easier move than adding a nice, thick layer of jam in between cookies. Wynne likes sandwiching her cocktail-inspired cherry negroni jam (see sidebar) between shortbreadlike Empire biscuits for a sour punch.

Balance out recipes. Wynne favours fruity jams that tend to be high in acidity. That makes her preserves ideal to use in decadent cakes to offset the sweetness, or as a filling in her angel biscuit doughnuts, a spin on one of her grandmother’s recipes with an easy yeasted dough. “Because they’re deep fried, there’s a richness of fat, so there needs to be [something] that cuts through that,” says Wynne, who uses her strawberry and passion fruit jam to achieve just that.

Swirl into batters. When you put a jam or marmalade directly into the batter of your baked goods, “it provides a lot of sweetness and moisture,” explains Wynne, who says her treats stay fresher longer when she uses this technique. Just be mindful of your other ingredients when trying this: Cut back on sugars and liquids, like milk or cream, so your mixture isn’t overly sweet or wet.

Camilla Wynne’s Cherry Negroni Jam

“When I sold this jam it had a very loyal following. It was the result of a collaboration between Preservation Society and Dillon’s Distillers in Niagara. We used their gin, vermouth and Orangecello, but you can of course use any brand of gin, sweet vermouth and bitter aperitivo. Sour cherries can be challenging to make into jam, as they have very little pectin. While for the most part I make jams without pectin, for this I used a little low-sugar pectin to get a soft set, once a lot of the water had cooked off and the jam had the concentrated cherry flavour I was looking for. That said, you don’t need to use it if you prefer not to. Just be aware that you will end up with fewer jars, as you’ll have to cook off more moisture to thicken the mixture.”

1 kg (6 1/2 cups) pitted sour cherries

575 g (2 3/4 cups + 2 tbsp) sugar

1 package (49 g) no-sugar-needed pectin

15 mL Campari or Dillon’s Orangecello

In a large bowl or container, combine the sour cherries, sugar and lemon juice and let macerate for at least 15 minutes, or up to 1 week, covered, in the refrigerator.

Loading.

Transfer the mixture to a pot or preserving pan and heat on medium-high, stirring occasionally. When the mixture comes to a boil, ladle out a few cups and carefully purée them (hot liquids can be volatile) in a blender to add body to the jam, since the cherries don’t really break down. Return the blended cherries to the pan and boil hard again, stirring frequently.

When the jam has reduced and thickened and is looking jammy, slowly add the pectin, stirring constantly. Let the jam cook for a few more minutes until the setting point is reached.

Remove from the heat and add all the liquor, stirring to combine. Pour into the prepared jars to within 1/4 to 1/8 inch of the rim. Remove any air bubbles, wipe the rims if necessary, seal and invert for 1 to 2 minutes. Flip right side up and let the jam sit, undisturbed, for 24 hours.

Makes four to five 250 mL (8 oz.) jars.

Excerpted from “Jam Bake” by Camilla Wynne, reproduced by arrangement with Appetite by Random House, a division of Penguin Random House Canada. Copyright © 2021 Camilla Wynne. Photography by Mickaël A. Bandassak. All rights reserved. When you make a purchase through the link in this article, we may earn a small commission. Our journalism is independent and not influenced by advertising. Learn more