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Fantastical Food from Michel Gondry's New Film 'Mood Indigo'

Fantastical Food from Michel Gondry's New Film 'Mood Indigo'

Before he meets Chloé (Audrey Tautou), Colin (Romain Duris) is an independently wealthy, idealistic inventor who is working on a Rube Goldberg-esque machine called the pianocktail, a piano which creates drinks based on how it’s played.

Play too fervently, for example, and an egg that’s meant to be stirred into a drink might get cooked instead.

Two cocktails are created by the pianocktail in Drafthouse Films’ Mood Indigo. Courtesy of Drafthouse Films.

In Mood Indigo, the latest film from Michel Gondry, the strange and surrealist food sequences provide some crucial moments of lightheartedness as the couple’s romance turns incredibly melancholy, all set to the music of Duke Ellington.

Chloé falls ill (a water lily is growing invasively in her lung) and the movie’s tone darkens throughout.

Omar Sy plays Nicholas, Colin’s best friend and lawyer, as well as personal chef, whose fantastical creations dance all over the kitchen, and are alive even when they’re cooked properly, like the slippery eel that finds its way into the pipes, or the cake made of pink ribbon and cotton puffs.

In Gondry’s films, nothing is limited to the physical dimensions of the world, and inanimate objects can’t be made to stay still.

We’ve got exclusive images of the incredible food imagery throughout the film, which debuts in the U.S. on July 18. We also spoke recently with Stéphane Rozenbaum, the film’s set designer, about creating the film’s whimsical culinary elements.

A delectable cake in Drafthouse Films’ Mood Indigo. Courtesy of Drafthouse Films.

Cake with a measure of philosophy in Drafthouse Films’ Mood Indigo. Courtesy of Drafthouse Films.

What design elements did you have in mind when you were designing the kitchen?

I wanted to mix together different periods of time. The kitchen has objects from 1900 to 1960, and we designed the food by looking at old cookbooks from the 1960s by French chefs and used the photographs for our designs.

What is the food in the film made out of?

Tissue, wool, wood, and jewelry — everything besides food.

A gourmet eel platter in Drafthouse Films’ Mood Indigo. Courtesy of Drafthouse Films.

A typical French picnic complete with roasted boar’s head in Drafthouse Films’ Mood Indigo. Courtesy of Drafthouse Films

How long did it take to build the pianocktail?

It took three months. Everything works — not from inside the piano but from outside the set we could control all the liquids and elements.

The food gets worse throughout the film as Chloe gets sick.

Yes, the apartment gets smaller and smaller, the ceiling gets pushed down. The food gets worse and worse as a metaphor of her being sick.

A feast is set in Drafthouse Films’ Mood Indigo. Courtesy of Drafthouse Films.

Mood Indigo opens in select theaters in the United States on July 18. Watch the trailer below:

For the latest food and drink updates, visit our Food News page.

Karen Lo is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @appleplexy.


Matching Curtains

Boris Vian’s 1947 novel L'Écume des jours – Froth on the Daydream – is not a surrealist tome I'm familiar with. So thank goodness for maverick director Michel Gondry: his new film Mood Indigo is a very enjoyable adaptation of said novel – if a little frothy (excuse the obvious pun).

The film’s basic premise is a doomed love story involving a water lily growing in the heroine’s lung, a profusion of multi-coloured flowers, a tiny man dressed as a mouse (just because), and a pianocktail (a cocktail-making piano, of course. And yes – I really, really want one). It’s visually daring, silly, astonishingly beautiful, and, in the end – a bit sad. The lupine Romain Duris and the woman who invented nu-gamine, Audrey Tautou, play lovers Colin and Chloe, living in a fantastical, surrealist Paris which quite frankly, had me at bonjour. The pair are divine together, the epitome of Gallic charm. Regular readers will no doubt sense my pleasure at the ascent of Duris, who is utterly seductive as the reformed bon viveur. Tautou is equally appealing (if not stretched) in yet another elfin role. The pair are ably supported by Gad Elmaleh (who fans of French cinema will remember starred with Tautou in Priceless and mined a rich Buster Keaton seam with great success), the stunning Aïssa Maïga, and Omar Sy – all of whom seem to be having a ball.

The story itself is structured within a self-reflexive narrative which takes Breton’s automatism to a brilliant conclusion: the tale is crafted by members of a typing pool in an elaborate, factory-like game of consequences in which it seems the typists compose whatever comes to them, before swinging their typewriter onto their neighbour to do the same. The choreography of these scenes is just what we’ve come to expect from Gondry – pure fun and fizz, the mundane turned inside out. So too are the dancing sequences, complete with pipe cleaner legs and bold cinematography (think that Supergrass video). Surrealism and a sense of play suffuses the film’s aesthetic, but the puns are as verbal as they are visual - you don’t need to scratch your head for too long, to deduce the origins of the character Jean-Sol Partre. Gondry’s dreamlike style pays homage to (and occasionally pokes fun at) these surrealist and existential schools of thought so often associated with the French intellect – and in doing so, gives the film its je ne sais quoi.

It's a shame then, that whilst the film remains hugely original, the film's second half is a little disappointing. The surrealism, whirls of colour, and at times gravity-defying sense of space which characterise the first half abruptly shift to a morose monochrome as Chloe’s life hangs in the balance. The effect on the viewer is instant: I went from smiling so much my face hurt, to feeling pretty flat. The stylist switch is clearly deliberate, but that doesn't mean that it succeeds. This is definitely a movie of two halves – a romantic split screen scene earlier in the movie typifies it perfectly – but unfortunately, the move towards death and murder doesn’t have quite the same effect as the happier scenes. Unlike the emotional punch of Gondry’s Eternal Sunshine, the style begins to overwhelm the substance. Perhaps this is perhaps because Colin and Chloe, charming though they are, are essentially archetypes rather than fully formed characters.

That’s not to say I didn’t find the latter part of the story sad – just that my emotions felt more at a distance. To start with, Gondry captures the feeling of falling in love wonderfully: giddy, giggly and gorgeous. But the film noir cinematography of the second part couldn't sustain the emotional journey Gondry wanted to take us on – maybe because we’d never really cared enough about the couple in the first place. With so much to see, there just didn’t feel room enough to feel.

Still, this is a pleasing little film which is definitely best seen in the cinema, for the magician-like directorial sleights to really impress. Perhaps the story’s segway into death and jealousy is in its way an analogy for the demise of a relationship, the sudden numbness one feels when they realise they no longer love as they used to? Even if the tragedy of Colin and Chloe isn’t as impactful as Gondry’s optical illusions and flourishes, I’d wager that – stylistically at least - this theory holds. Or perhaps I am thinking too deeply about a film which is best enjoyed as if an extended (Duke Ellington) music video. On these merits, its indulgence and initial euphoria can’t fail.


Michel Gondry On The Powerful Influence Of Author Boris Vian

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind director Michel Gondry's new film, Mood Indigo, is an adaptation of French writer Boris Vian's L'ecume des jours, which was first published in 1947. It was later translated into English under the titles Froth on the Daydream and Foam of the Daze.

In a short exclusive for BuzzFeed, Gondry describes how the book has had a powerful influence on his work, a sentiment echoed by the producer and stars of Mood Indigo:

Like the generations that preceded and have followed me, I grew up under the influence and inspiration of Boris Vian. Vian seemed to come from my own past, as parts of his L'Écume des jours resonate with my personal life. Most notably, my father's commitment to Duke Ellington, a tutelary figure of L'Écume des jours, whose records he played for me when I was a child.

The memory of reading L'Écume des jours (Mood Indigo) has had an influence on many of my films, especially the music videos I made for Bjork, but also in some aspects of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep, and Be Kind Rewind. It became part of the vocabulary I used unconsciously, while discovering the filmmaking process. Today, it comes naturally to me, coming up with visual solutions — ideas to materialize the world of Boris Vian. It's as if all those years of filming had been a slow preparation for making my film Mood Indigo.

Mood Indigo star Audrey Tautou said of L'Écume des jours, "I read the novel when I was young, and it was my favorite book."

Mood Indigo star Romain Duris said of the novel, "Boris Vian was indignant that society crushes the individual and therefore, at the heart of the book and the film, there is a rebellious and anarchistic spirit that refuses to be enslaved by work."

Producer Luc Bossi said, "I read the book as a teenager but it was only later that I realized how much L'Écume des Jours was one of the most visual books in French literature. Its fantastic approach and the tragic love story it tells offered some wonderful cinematographic material. … Very early on I suggested Michel Gondry. I couldn't say that I offered the project to Michel as soon as I met with him, he told me he'd always wanted to make the film and would always be looking to do the project. It was a meeting of desires. To him, Mood Indigo was like a summary of his career because a part of what he does is influenced by Boris Vian."

A new translation by Stanley Chapmen of Boris Vian's L'Écume des jours, now titled Mood Indigo, is out now from FSG. You can read an excerpt here.


A simple romantic engagement that travels the (almost literal) rollercoaster of a relationship, dressed in an imaginative artistry that is quite indescribable with mere words, but I will try. This inventive kaleidoscope of colour and life that Michel Gondry has offered up with his latest surrealist vision is an overwhelming feast for the senses based on Boris Vian's cult French novel 'Froth On The Daydream'.

Now that I have sucked you in, be warned that there are two 'official' cuts of the film. The original 130 minute cut that was released in France, but also a much tighter, narratively focussed 94 minute cut that Gondry supervised along with a different editor in Tariq Anwar who cut The King's Speech and…

"This feeling of solitude is unfair. I demand to fall in love too!"

No one does surrealism better than the French, but unfortunately I'm not into surrealism and I usually have a hard time enjoying this genre in general. Mood Indigo is probably more surreal than any other film you've seen before, and despite the fantastic visuals and rich imagery used I had a hard time engaging with the characters and its lack of a strong narrative story. I was a huge fan of director, Michel Gondry's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and despite the surrealism in that film I enjoyed the strong narrative along with the romance, but I guess a lot of that had to do with…

Performances: 6.7/10
Story: 2/10
Production: 6.3/10
Overall: 5/10

Hello disappointment, it's been a while!

Since first seeing the trailer for Mood Indigo what feels like years ago, I've been anxiously waiting for Michel Gondry's latest to be released in America. Now that I've finally got around to watching it I just feel nauseated.

It's not that it was "so bad it was good" it's that it was so over-the-top weird that it became painful to watch. From the very first scene it was apparent that the quirk knob was dialed up to 10 and I don't think it ever backed off once. There were numerous stop-motion sequences of moving food, strange doorbells and self-tying, leg-twisting shoes. None of this services…


Review: Michel Gondry’s ‘Mood Indigo’ is wildly inventive

To call Michel Gondry’s “Mood Indigo” visually inventive is not even scratching the surface, something like characterizing Apple as a company that’s had a certain amount of success.

Wacky, surreal, insanely playful, “Mood Indigo” is a film that believes that too much is not enough. Even for a wild and crazy director like Gondry, whose films run the gamut from the exceptional (“Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind”) through the unwatchable (“Human Nature”), this is something out of the ordinary.

Adapted from Boris Vian’s 1947 cult novel “L’Ecume des Jours” (Froth on the Daydream) a cultural touchstone in France, “Mood Indigo” is definitely an odd film, both giddy and melancholy, engaging and disturbing.

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FOR THE RECORD:

Actor’s credits: A July 18 Calendar section review of the film “Mood Indigo” said actor Omar Sy’s credits included “The Untouchables.” Sy was in “The Intouchables.”
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If it doesn’t have as much emotional resonance as “Spotless Mind,” its visuals are off the charts. And its brisk 94-minute running time (more than 35 minutes shorter than the French release) means that though the relentlessness of the on-screen antics threatens to wear you out, the film is over before that can quite happen.

Set in a completely made-up world that Gondry and production designer Stéphane Rozenbaum created from bits and pieces of Paris past, a world that includes eels coming out of faucets and plants sprouting instantly, “Mood Indigo” presents the kind of concoctions that Disney cartoon inventor Gyro Gearloose would love.

Chief among these is the “pianocktail,” a machine that mixes drinks in a manner dictated by what is played on a piano keyboard. This bizarre contraption, which took the production team months to build, is the proud invention of protagonist Colin (Romain Duris).

An independently wealthy young man whose apartment includes a doorbell that metamorphoses into a crawling beetle when rung, Colin has two best friends, his chef and major-domo Nicholas (“The Untouchables’” Omar Sy) and Chick (Gad Elmaleh).

But when Chick announces that he has met the girl of his dreams in Alise (Aissa Maiga), Colin starts to feel left out. “Solitude is unbearable,” he pouts. “I demand to fall in love too.”

No sooner said than done. Colin goes to a party where he meets Chloe (Audrey Tautou), who just happens to share a name with one of his favorite pieces of Duke Ellington music.

Both are self-conscious, but after Chloe says “let’s bumble together,” romance takes its course. Seeing the happy couple travel over Paris in a cloud shaped like a swan (or a swan shaped like a cloud) is to experience the romantic Gondry at his dreamiest.

But one of the things that gives “Mood Indigo” and the novel it’s based on a particular flavor is that the happiness Chick and Colin have found is not fated to last.

Chick, as it turns out, is ruinously addicted to acquiring the works of philosopher Jean-Sol Partre. The sections where Chick visits dealers and discusses the finer points of his acquisitions are as dead-on a satire of the antiquarian book world as you are going to find.

Even worse, in the midst of their happiness, Colin’s beloved Chloe gets seriously ill. The malady, as a doctor played by Gondry himself discovers, is that a large water lily is growing in her lung. This may sound ridiculous, but in the context of the film it is deadly serious.

With its indefinable, almost indescribable combination of whimsy, sentiment and strangeness, “Mood Indigo” (co-written by Gondry and Luc Bossi) will not be to all tastes at all times. But frame for frame, the amount of invention going on here can’t be believed unless it’s seen.


Mood Indigo

At a time when so much filmmaking is marked by rampant laziness, it’s both refreshing and a little daunting to encounter a film of such nonstop invention and creativity as Michel Gondry’s Mood Indigo. Some may find the film perplexing in its fantasy. Others may find the constant invention exhausting. In the latter regard, I freely confess that my initial viewing of Mood Indigo was … startling, to put it mildly. The first five minutes just never slowed down, to the point that it seemed like overkill. (Some will doubtless say that it is overkill.) But I quickly realized that the only way to approach the film was just to surrender to it and go with the flow. Immediately after that first viewing — but before tackling the whole thing a second time — I took a second look at the beginning and its fast-paced flood of fantasticated images (all set to Duke Ellington’s “Take the A Train”). Having a feel for the whole movie and knowing where it was going, the opening felt just right on a second viewing — neither exhausting, nor overkill.

Gondry’s film is an adaptation of Boris Vian’s 1947 novel L’Écume des jours (Froth on the Daydream), which may account for the fact that while three Duke Ellington recordings appear in the film, “Mood Indigo” does not. (This may also be due to cutting, since I understand the U.S. version is considerably shortened from the French original.) Regardless, the title Mood Indigo ultimately suits the tone of the movie. While the film never loses its sense of invention, what starts — or seems to start — as quirky, hyperstylized fantasy becomes increasingly dark as the film progresses. This is deceptive, too, because the undercurrent of darkness is there all along, but the characters — and to some degree the audience — don’t see it. And while I’ve described the film as comedy-tragedy, the ending is more bittersweet and weirdly celebratory than tragic. While, yes, the film grows very dark — so dark that the color is slowly drained from the film — I would never call it depressing.

The film starts with a quote from Boris Vian announcing, “This story is completely true, since I made it up from beginning to end.” But what is the story? Well, stripped of most things that make Mood Indigo a breathlessly mesmerizing film, the story is pretty simple and — Gondry suggests in the way it’s pieced together from bits of a manuscript being written by lots of scribes with constantly moving typewriters on a kind of assembly line — more universal than it might seem. Colin (Romain Duris) is a comfortably-off young man, living in a marvelous set of apartments apparently joined by a train car. He has a personal chef, Nicolas (Omar Sy), who prepares fantastic meals with the help of a strangely interactive TV chef (Alain Chabat) and a hyperintelligent mouse (Sacha Bourdo) of indeterminate gender. (The mouse, in fact, is one of the film’s most likable characters.) He has a good friend, Chick (Gad Elmaleh), and he has a good time inventing strange Rube Goldberg inventions (the piano cocktail being his latest). His world is so perfect that he can even play the sunbeams coming through the windows like an upright bass .

But something is missing — a love life. That presents itself at a party where he meets Chloé (Audrey), whom, after a fantasy courtship only Gondry would attempt (and pull off), he marries. But on their honeymoon, she contracts a strange ailment. How strange? Well, she’s growing a water lily in her lung. The treatment, according to a very strange doctor (Gondry himself), involves some very odd pills (involving golden carrots and mechanical rabbits) and surrounding Chloé with flowers. Between the expense of these increasingly weird treatments and supporting Chick’s self-destructive obsession with the writer-philosopher Jean-Sol Partre (Philippe Torreton) — a pipe-smoking egghead and cult figure based (unsubtly) on Vian’s friend, Jean-Paul Sartre — Colin soon finds his money gone and his world darkening, even as Chloé gets no better.

That almost certainly sounds more grim than the film is — though, make no mistake, Mood Indigo is not simply a lot of fun. The sadness that hovers over the film and finally closes in on it is very real. But — and this is key — Gondry never loses sight of the strange magic that holds his film together. It’s all surreal and fanciful. One part Max Fleischer “rubber-hose” style animation to one part René Magritte — with a shot of Dadaism and a dash of jazz — might be a fair summation of the recipe. But it’s all also pure Gondry at his most creative. It may, in fact, be his best film to date. Certainly, it’s his most breathtakingly creative one — and one of the year’s best films. (Plus, it explains how Internet searches actually work.) But it definitely won’t be to everyone’s liking. Then again, it doesn’t try to be — and why should it? Not Rated but contains adult themes and subtitles.


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Mood Indigo is the Jean-Sol Parte of narratives. Based on a cult novel by Boris Vian called L'Écume des jours, or Froth on the Daydream, it tells how Colin lives in happy fancy with his cook Nicolas (Omar Sy), whose mentor is a TV chef who lives in the TV with occasional forays into the fridge.

Colin's best friend is Chick (Gad Elmaleh), a devoted Partre fan who has the philosopher's books not only on bound pages, but also in pills that you can swallow. He announces that he also has access to Existentialism is Rheumatism in syrup form.

Where were we? Oh yes, when Chick finds himself a girlfriend, Colin puts on his shoes - they behave like dogs who are excited by the idea of a walk - and heads to a party where he meets Chloé. She's played by Audrey Tautou, no longer the ingenue of Amélie but still with that gamine pout that signals we're in for something fanciful and impossibly

Gallic. "Ever been played by Duke Ellington?" Colin asks her, having just heard the Ellington tune Chloe. See, it all kind of makes sense.

They wed, first taking a ride on a cloud ship then having a split-screen honeymoon that is both rainy and sunny. She's adorably quirky and laissez-faire ("we have our whole lives to get it right"), but eventually tragedy strikes: like a surreal Camille, Chloé develops a bad cough, although its cause is bizarrely ornamental. The doctor they call is played by Gondry himself, another indication that we're neck-deep in the unicorn fields of his imagination. As Chloé struggles to cope, and Colin has to take a real job to keep her in life-giving flowers - real jobs are portrayed as dark, dehumanizing assembly lines of humiliation - Mood Indigo (also the name of an Ellington composition) becomes leached of colour. By the end, it's a black and white movie. Colin and Chloé's apartment also gets smaller in every scene, until eventually they have to crawl through the doorways.

There's lots more, much of it animated or elongated by special effects. Mood Indigo is wild, gorgeous and exhausting. It's the most picturesque nonsense you'll see this year.


Mood Indigo review: Visually amazing, emotionally shallow

Colin’s best friend Chick (Gad Elmaleh) falls for Alise (Aïssa Maïga), the niece of Colin’s brilliantly resourceful manservant Nicolas (Omar Sy). Naturally, Colin (Romain Duris) demands to “fall in love too”.

Enter Chloe (Audrey Tautou), whom Colin marries after a go-kart race and a whirlwind Parisian romance (with a nod to Agnès Varda). Unhappily, the new bride soon develops a debilitating lily growing from her lung, one that will be fatal if she isn’t surrounded by flowers at all times.

Mood Indigo/L'Ecume des Jours

Director Michel Gondry
Genre Comedy
Running Time 95 min
Starring Romain Duris, Audrey Tautou, Gad Elmaleh, Omar Sy

Colin’s fortune soon shrinks, both figuratively and literally. But not before we’ve watched dancing pepperpots, doorbells that crawl down the wall, hyperactive food, a dining table wearing roller skates, a Rubik’s cube-styled personal planner, cloud chairlifts, transparent saloon cars, shoes that run on ahead if the wearer is late, rotating handshakes, period futurism, and conveyer-belt typewriters tapping to Duke Ellington’s Take the A Train.

S’ wonderful. S’ marvellous. S’ exhausting.

It ought to have been a marriage made in heaven: the extravagantly imaginative French film-maker Michel Gondry directs and co-writes an adaptation of Boris Vian’s 1947 surrealist masterpiece Froth of the Daydream. But Gondry tends to produce his best work when there are boundaries, even if those boundaries are as unconventional as a Daft Punk promo or a Charlie Kaufman screenplay (think Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind). Vian, alas, is not the go-to guy for boundaries.

Gondry does splendid things with such mad analogue contraptions as Vian’s piano-cocktail, an instrument that produces drinks that reflect the tune being played. Stop-motion whirls animate every corner of every shot. There’s a commendably barmy subplot featuring a pop philosopher called Jean-Sol Partre (Sartre and Vian were pals) whose pronouncements prove ruinously addictive for Chick: “Existentialism is rheumatism in syrup form” or “The man sandwich disembowels”.

Visually, Mood Indigo is amazing. Mais bien sûr! Emotionally, despite valiant efforts from Duris and Sy, it lacks even the cutesy-pie depth of Gondry’s Be Kind Rewind or The Science of Sleep.

Whimsy, however pretty, is no substitute for substance. And dream logic, however loopy, is a poor locum for storytelling.


August 11, 2014

Mood Indigo

Boris Vian’s 1947 novel L'Écume des jours – Froth on the Daydream – is not a surrealist tome I'm familiar with. So thank goodness for maverick director Michel Gondry: his new film Mood Indigo is a very enjoyable adaptation of said novel – if a little frothy (excuse the obvious pun).

The film’s basic premise is a doomed love story involving a water lily growing in the heroine’s lung, a profusion of multi-coloured flowers, a tiny man dressed as a mouse (just because), and a pianocktail (a cocktail-making piano, of course. And yes – I really, really want one). It’s visually daring, silly, astonishingly beautiful, and, in the end – a bit sad. The lupine Romain Duris and the woman who invented nu-gamine, Audrey Tautou, play lovers Colin and Chloe, living in a fantastical, surrealist Paris which quite frankly, had me at bonjour. The pair are divine together, the epitome of Gallic charm. Regular readers will no doubt sense my pleasure at the ascent of Duris, who is utterly seductive as the reformed bon viveur. Tautou is equally appealing (if not stretched) in yet another elfin role. The pair are ably supported by Gad Elmaleh (who fans of French cinema will remember starred with Tautou in Priceless and mined a rich Buster Keaton seam with great success), the stunning Aïssa Maïga, and Omar Sy – all of whom seem to be having a ball.

The story itself is structured within a self-reflexive narrative which takes Breton’s automatism to a brilliant conclusion: the tale is crafted by members of a typing pool in an elaborate, factory-like game of consequences in which it seems the typists compose whatever comes to them, before swinging their typewriter onto their neighbour to do the same. The choreography of these scenes is just what we’ve come to expect from Gondry – pure fun and fizz, the mundane turned inside out. So too are the dancing sequences, complete with pipe cleaner legs and bold cinematography (think that Supergrass video). Surrealism and a sense of play suffuses the film’s aesthetic, but the puns are as verbal as they are visual - you don’t need to scratch your head for too long, to deduce the origins of the character Jean-Sol Partre. Gondry’s dreamlike style pays homage to (and occasionally pokes fun at) these surrealist and existential schools of thought so often associated with the French intellect – and in doing so, gives the film its je ne sais quoi.

It's a shame then, that whilst the film remains hugely original, the film's second half is a little disappointing. The surrealism, whirls of colour, and at times gravity-defying sense of space which characterise the first half abruptly shift to a morose monochrome as Chloe’s life hangs in the balance. The effect on the viewer is instant: I went from smiling so much my face hurt, to feeling pretty flat. The stylist switch is clearly deliberate, but that doesn't mean that it succeeds. This is definitely a movie of two halves – a romantic split screen scene earlier in the movie typifies it perfectly – but unfortunately, the move towards death and murder doesn’t have quite the same effect as the happier scenes. Unlike the emotional punch of Gondry’s Eternal Sunshine, the style begins to overwhelm the substance. Perhaps this is perhaps because Colin and Chloe, charming though they are, are essentially archetypes rather than fully formed characters.

That’s not to say I didn’t find the latter part of the story sad – just that my emotions felt more at a distance. To start with, Gondry captures the feeling of falling in love wonderfully: giddy, giggly and gorgeous. But the film noir cinematography of the second part couldn't sustain the emotional journey Gondry wanted to take us on – maybe because we’d never really cared enough about the couple in the first place. With so much to see, there just didn’t feel room enough to feel.

Still, this is a pleasing little film which is definitely best seen in the cinema, for the magician-like directorial sleights to really impress. Perhaps the story’s segway into death and jealousy is in its way an analogy for the demise of a relationship, the sudden numbness one feels when they realise they no longer love as they used to? Even if the tragedy of Colin and Chloe isn’t as impactful as Gondry’s optical illusions and flourishes, I’d wager that – stylistically at least - this theory holds. Or perhaps I am thinking too deeply about a film which is best enjoyed as if an extended (Duke Ellington) music video. On these merits, its indulgence and initial euphoria can’t fail.


Sexy French Sausages

I hadn’t been to Nosh in ages so I visited there on Wednesday afternoon. Yip, still love that place. It was ok weather when I left the house but it was pelting felines and canines the whole walk back. Committed much? I’m still convinced that you can shop smartly there and come out better off than your giant Australian chain. $3 for 3 avocados? Yes please! A bag of rocket for $2.50? Don’t mind if I do. I was casually browsing the meat section as I usually do, when I spied some sexy French sausages. The sausages sang to me, “Bonjour, mon cher ami, bon-jo-ur!” and I shyly fudged a little high-school French back. There was something very likeable about these sausages and we became instant friends. Later on, with sausages safely tucked away in the fridge, I asked The Googe about these new sausage friends of mine. I guess asking The Googe about a new ingredient is like Facestalking someone you’ve just befriended. The Googe says: Toulouse sausage. Pronunciation: too-LOOZ Notes: This exquisite French &hellip

A little about me

I am Genie, a graphic designer obsessed with food and bunnies. I live in Whanganui, New Zealand with my husband, The Koala and our rabbits Kobe and Bento.

I write about my hedonistic ways and I love the mantra "Eat well, travel often" and I prefer not to write about myself in third person.


Watch the video: MOOD INDIGO - Official UK Trailer - Starring Audrey Tautou And Romain Duris (January 2022).