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Sumac-Roasted Carrot Dip

Sumac-Roasted Carrot Dip

This twist on hummus combines roasted carrots with sumac, honey, garlic, and tahini with crave-worthy results.

Ingredients

Roasted Carrots:

  • Olive oil (for drizzling)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Dip:

  • 2 Tbsp. water, plus more as needed
  • 4 tsp. sumac, plus more for sprinkling

Optional toppings:

  • Crushed pistachios or almonds

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat the oven to 425°.

  • Cut ends off carrots and peel. Place on a sheet tray, and drizzle liberally with olive oil and tablespoon of honey. Season with salt and pepper to taste, tossing to coat completely. Roast in the oven for about 45 minutes or until fork-tender and caramelized. Check them halfway through.

  • Remove carrots from oven and blend in a Vitamix E310 Blender for 4–5 minutes starting on level 1 and slowly progressing to level 6, adding in the rest of the ingredients until a smooth paste forms. Add more water if necessary. Transfer to a serving bowl and top with olive oil, sumac, nuts, and feta.

  • Serve with pita chips or crudités.


Roasted Carrot, Apple, and Celery Soup (Pareve or Dairy)

Roasting intensifies the flavors and smooths the texture of the vegetables and fruit in this vibrant carrot, apple, and celery soup. It's truly more than the sum of its parts—you probably won't be able to pick out the individual flavors of apple or celery, but both add nuance and depth to the recipe.

While the butter is optional, it pulls the flavors together and adds a touch of richness. If you're serving a dairy meal, it makes a wonderful addition. You don't need much, so choose high-quality (preferably organic) unsalted butter.

Brown bagging your lunch? Tote along a thermos of this soup to go with your favorite sandwich or a hearty grain salad.


Carrot cake donut holes with cream cheese frosting dip

Turn donuts into dippers with these sweet, warm, cinnamony carrot treats.

If you follow my recipes, it’s no secret I have a bit of a sweet tooth, and would rather bake than cook almost any day. But it’s a funny thing – I never really liked donuts, especially fried ones. And then I had to write an article on donut making, and test out various recipes, methods and techniques. Somewhere in the middle off all that testing I decided that donuts aren’t half bad, and that these little carrot donuts are quite the bomb.

The way I see it, you’ve got to make fried homemade donuts at least once in your lifetime, and this is the donut recipe you want. Trust me. Just do yourself a favor and invite a small crowd of friends and family over to share them or you’ll find yourself consuming a few too many on your own….

Ingredients

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup coconut or unsweetened almond milk
  • 1/2 cup drained crushed pineapple
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 cup grated carrots (about 6 carrots)
  • Small bowl of cinnamon and sugar mixture
  • 1 quart oil, for frying

Cream cheese frosting dip

Directions

Heat a little less than a quart of peanut or canola oil in a heavy Dutch oven. Use a thermometer to keep the temperature at about 350°.

Whisk together first 6 dry ingredients. Make a well in the middle, and add milk, pineapple and egg and stir gently to combine liquids, then mix entire batter.

Add melted butter and mix until smooth dough starts forming, then fold in carrots gently.

Use a small cookie scoop to form balls, and drop into hot oil. Fry for 3 minutes, flipping halfway, then drain and transfer to paper towel lined platter.

After cooling slightly, dip in cinnamon and sugar mixture and transfer to wire rack to cool completely.

To make cream cheese dip, beat cream cheese and milk until smooth. Add 1 cup confectioner’s sugar, and beat until light and fluffy. Add more milk if dip is too thick.

Serve donut holes with cream cheese frosting dip on the side. Best served warm.

Note: Donuts will remain fresh at room temperature for 24 hours, or frozen in an airtight container.

Sarah F. Berkowitz is a foodie and writer. Born in Israel, she lives in the deep South and enjoys feeding friends, family and random strangers home-cooked meals.


Hole-in-the-wall beef skewers

These kebabs are simple to make and cook fast on a barbecue. Rather than serve them in a wrap, smear a plate with a slick of hummus, add the skewers – then top the meat with a really zesty mix of red onion, sumac and parsley.

Fennel salad

A seriously simple fennel salad recipe, with a pomegranate molasses and sumac dressing. Use a mandoline or sharp knife to slice the fennel as thinly as possible.

Sumac and olive oil-roasted salmon with spiced carrot salad

Coat salmon in olive oil and sumac for a a showstopping centrepiece.

Sumac-roasted chicken traybake

This sumac-roasted chicken traybake is packed with flavour, plus it’s low in calories and gluten free. Serve with zesty yogurt dressing for a quick and easy summer dish.

Squash toast with feta, sumac and poached egg

Try this squash toast with feta, sumac and poached egg for a quick and healthy, vegetarian brunch for one under 300 calories.

Sumac chicken and green bean salad

This sumac chicken and green bean salad is ready in just 20 minutes and under 300 calories, perfect for an easy midweek meal.

Sumac roast cauliflower and chicken salad with mint yogurt

Ready in under 30 minutes, this minty chicken and tangy lemony roast cauliflower dish makes a quick and easy low-calorie gluten free meal for two.

Fried aubergine sticks with sumac and honey

Easy aubergine sticks: designed to impress your friends and family as a quick dinner-party starter, or as part of an easy lunch. With a minty yogurt dip, this Mediterranean-inspired recipe with sumac and za’atar just needs a drizzle of honey to finish it off.

Roasted butternut and feta salad with quinoa, avocado and sumac

This recipe is from head chef Tim Yates at the East London restaurant 100 Hoxton. This colourful dish is flavoured with sumac, ras el hanout (a North African spice) and coriander and can be made in advance.

Fattoush with crisp spiced chickpeas

A vibrant, summery salad that mixes chickpeas with herby pitta croutons, radishes, tomatoes, sumac and a pomegranate molasses dressing.

Adana kebabs

These Turkish-style kebabs are named after the city of Adana and flavoured with chilli and sumac. Make them to feed a crowd at your next barbecue.


  1. At a picnic: eat outdoors with homemade spiced lentil crackers.
  2. A quick snack: enjoy crunchy fresh veggies with this dip.
  3. Light lunch: spread dip on bread and add salad for a tasty sandwich.

Roasted pumpkin and sumac dip is easy to prepare and tastes delicious. It is quick to make for an impromptu picnic or a savoury snack.

Did you enjoy this pumpkin dip at a picnic?

Let me know by leaving a comment and a recipe rating below – I’d love to hear from you.

Are you looking for more pumpkin recipes? Make this next: savoury baklava


Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound chicken thighs with skin
  • ½ pound skinless, boneless chicken breasts
  • ½ pound chicken drumsticks
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 4 medium onions, cut into wedges
  • 1 tablespoon sumac powder
  • 1 pinch ground black pepper

Marinate chicken thighs, breasts, and drumsticks in olive oil, lemon juice, and salt for at least 1 hour and up to overnight.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

Mix onions, sumac, and pepper into the chicken. Pour mixture into a nonstick baking pan. Cover with aluminum foil.

Bake in the preheated oven until an instant-read thermometer inserted near the bone reads 165 degrees F (74 degrees C), about 45 minutes. Remove foil halfway through to give the chicken a nice golden color and crunch.


Roasted Cauliflower with Tahini Sauce and Pomegranate Seeds

Steamed cauliflower stinks. Growing up I couldn’t stand the smell that would permeate beyond the kitchen when my Mom would steam cauliflower. So, for years I didn’t think that I liked cauliflower because it would never make it past my lips based on the smell alone.

Then, one day I discovered roasted cauliflower and my entire world view of cauliflower completely changed. Suddenly, I couldn’t get enough of the stuff. I often have cauliflower in my grocery cart during the winter months especially when the availability of fresh locally-grown produce is sparse.

Have you tried roasting cauliflower? I want to urge you to give it go if you’ve only had it steamed and didn’t care for it. You might find that roasting cauliflower changes your mind. I love cauliflower roasted simply with olive oil, salt, and pepper. But, sometimes you want a dish that has a little more pizzazz.

I think this roasted cauliflower with tahini sauce and pomegranate seeds could be a star of your holiday table. Or, it would brighten up a dreary winter meal. The pomegranate seeds make the dish sparkle!

The cauliflower is seasoned with an array of warming spices including sumac. Sumac is commonly used in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern cooking. If you aren’t familiar with sumac, it is well worth adding this lemony-flavored spice to your pantry. Sumac can be found as Middle Eastern markets or ordered online. Buying new spices is one of the reasons I love shopping at ethnic markets.

Tahini is crushed sesame seed paste and a crucial ingredient in hummus, baba ghanoush (roasted eggplant dip), and halva (a sweet confection which was a childhood favorite of mine). Tahini is available in most supermarkets in the ethnic food aisle. You will want to give the paste a stir before using because much like natural peanut butter, tahini can separate when sitting on the shelf.


Cool Beans: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking with the World's Most Versatile Plant-Based Protein, with 125 Recipes [A Cookbook]

Just received this book today and had to write a review immediately. Its gorgeous!

Joe Yonan's book Cool Beans has a recommendation by Steve Sando from Rancho Gordo as "just plain inspiring" and that was good enough for me! I have Steves books too and only purchase my beans from Rancho Gordo or from my local farmers market after repeatedly having issues with old, dry, hard beans in stores (even from Whole Foods) I have been cooking a lot of beans lately trying to amp up my plant protien and wind back on the meat. Even though I had a few bean cookbooks I purchased this one as soon as I saw it.

I never pay full price for my books. Well, when I say never I actually mean occasionally. When I just can't wait for the price to drop on Amazon. But I am a cheapskate and I hate paying full price for anything but this book was one of those books I had to buy immediately.

So here I am, newly minted copy in hand, excitedly deciding what to make first.

Chapter list is as follows:
-Dips and Snacks
-Salads
-Soups, Stews and Soupy things
-Burgers, Sandwiches, wraps, tacos and a pizza
-Casseroles, pasta, rice and hearty main courses
-drinks and desserts
-condiments and other pantry recipes

Lets look at some of the recipes.

-Dips 22 recipes including:
harissa carrot and white bean dip
spicy ethiopian red lentil dip
black bean sopes
corn hummus with spicy corn relish
ecuadorian lupini bean ceviche (see pic)

-Salads 14 recipes including:
red gem salad with green curry goddess and crispy lentils
lady cream pea, sweet potato and charred okra salad
winter salad with cranberry beans, squash and pomegranate (see pic)

-Soup etc 28 recipes including:
georgian kidney bean stew with corn flatbreads and pickled cabbage
smoky black bean and plantain chili
red lentil ful with sumac roasted
cauliflower (see pic)

-Burgers etc 17 recipes including:
chickpea tarragon sandwiches
black bean chipotle falafel burgers
yellow bean and spinach dosas (see pic)

-Casseroles etc 26 recipes including:
orecchiette with borlotti beans, bitter greens and lemony breadcrumbs
Tofu Migas with black beans and nopales
crispy hoppin john with smoked tofu

-Drinks and desserts (yes, really!)
13 recipes including:
Plantain, black sesame and white bean quick bread
chocolate, red bean and rose brownies (see pic)
red bean icecream (see pic)
salty margarita sour with aquafaba

-Condiments etc 6 recipes including:
chickpea aioli
coconut cashew yoghurt
herb marinated tofu feta

Joe Yonan is the food editor at the Washington Post. In Cool Beans he has provided us with global vegetarian bean inspiration. Many of you, like myself are either cutting back on meat or trying to broaden an already meatless diet and are looking at ways to increase our intake of plant protein. For those of us, this book is a must have! With loads of gorgeous full page photographs and 125 unique and delicious sounding recipes I am feeling pretty inspired. Please check back. I will update this review as I cook from this book.

A little about me:
I have been known to taste test 10 different soy sauces in one sitting (not sure I want to repeat that experiment)
I recently purchased 9 different lemon zesters just to determine which one was best (you can view the results on my profile page)
I enjoy writing reviews and this hobby of mine gives me an outlet to share my culinary explorations.
If this review has been helpful to you would you please click the helpful button? I like to think that my reviews help filter out the crap for other like-minded buyers who are hunting for the same products that I am :)
It makes my day to see that my kitchen insanity helped a fellow customer.
You might also like to visit my profile page and check out some of my other ingredient and recipe book and kitchen tool reviews and idea lists. You can also click to follow me on my profile page to be notified when I post a new review.
Happy cooking (and eating)

Top critical review

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From the United States

Just received this book today and had to write a review immediately. Its gorgeous!

Joe Yonan's book Cool Beans has a recommendation by Steve Sando from Rancho Gordo as "just plain inspiring" and that was good enough for me! I have Steves books too and only purchase my beans from Rancho Gordo or from my local farmers market after repeatedly having issues with old, dry, hard beans in stores (even from Whole Foods) I have been cooking a lot of beans lately trying to amp up my plant protien and wind back on the meat. Even though I had a few bean cookbooks I purchased this one as soon as I saw it.

I never pay full price for my books. Well, when I say never I actually mean occasionally. When I just can't wait for the price to drop on Amazon. But I am a cheapskate and I hate paying full price for anything but this book was one of those books I had to buy immediately.

So here I am, newly minted copy in hand, excitedly deciding what to make first.

Chapter list is as follows:
-Dips and Snacks
-Salads
-Soups, Stews and Soupy things
-Burgers, Sandwiches, wraps, tacos and a pizza
-Casseroles, pasta, rice and hearty main courses
-drinks and desserts
-condiments and other pantry recipes

Lets look at some of the recipes.

-Dips 22 recipes including:
harissa carrot and white bean dip
spicy ethiopian red lentil dip
black bean sopes
corn hummus with spicy corn relish
ecuadorian lupini bean ceviche (see pic)

-Salads 14 recipes including:
red gem salad with green curry goddess and crispy lentils
lady cream pea, sweet potato and charred okra salad
winter salad with cranberry beans, squash and pomegranate (see pic)

-Soup etc 28 recipes including:
georgian kidney bean stew with corn flatbreads and pickled cabbage
smoky black bean and plantain chili
red lentil ful with sumac roasted
cauliflower (see pic)

-Burgers etc 17 recipes including:
chickpea tarragon sandwiches
black bean chipotle falafel burgers
yellow bean and spinach dosas (see pic)

-Casseroles etc 26 recipes including:
orecchiette with borlotti beans, bitter greens and lemony breadcrumbs
Tofu Migas with black beans and nopales
crispy hoppin john with smoked tofu

-Drinks and desserts (yes, really!)
13 recipes including:
Plantain, black sesame and white bean quick bread
chocolate, red bean and rose brownies (see pic)
red bean icecream (see pic)
salty margarita sour with aquafaba

-Condiments etc 6 recipes including:
chickpea aioli
coconut cashew yoghurt
herb marinated tofu feta

Joe Yonan is the food editor at the Washington Post. In Cool Beans he has provided us with global vegetarian bean inspiration. Many of you, like myself are either cutting back on meat or trying to broaden an already meatless diet and are looking at ways to increase our intake of plant protein. For those of us, this book is a must have! With loads of gorgeous full page photographs and 125 unique and delicious sounding recipes I am feeling pretty inspired. Please check back. I will update this review as I cook from this book.

A little about me:
I have been known to taste test 10 different soy sauces in one sitting (not sure I want to repeat that experiment)
I recently purchased 9 different lemon zesters just to determine which one was best (you can view the results on my profile page)
I enjoy writing reviews and this hobby of mine gives me an outlet to share my culinary explorations.
If this review has been helpful to you would you please click the helpful button? I like to think that my reviews help filter out the crap for other like-minded buyers who are hunting for the same products that I am :)
It makes my day to see that my kitchen insanity helped a fellow customer.
You might also like to visit my profile page and check out some of my other ingredient and recipe book and kitchen tool reviews and idea lists. You can also click to follow me on my profile page to be notified when I post a new review.
Happy cooking (and eating)

Just received this book today and had to write a review immediately. Its gorgeous!

Joe Yonan's book Cool Beans has a recommendation by Steve Sando from Rancho Gordo as "just plain inspiring" and that was good enough for me! I have Steves books too and only purchase my beans from Rancho Gordo or from my local farmers market after repeatedly having issues with old, dry, hard beans in stores (even from Whole Foods) I have been cooking a lot of beans lately trying to amp up my plant protien and wind back on the meat. Even though I had a few bean cookbooks I purchased this one as soon as I saw it.

I never pay full price for my books. Well, when I say never I actually mean occasionally. When I just can't wait for the price to drop on Amazon. But I am a cheapskate and I hate paying full price for anything but this book was one of those books I had to buy immediately.

So here I am, newly minted copy in hand, excitedly deciding what to make first.

Chapter list is as follows:
-Dips and Snacks
-Salads
-Soups, Stews and Soupy things
-Burgers, Sandwiches, wraps, tacos and a pizza
-Casseroles, pasta, rice and hearty main courses
-drinks and desserts
-condiments and other pantry recipes

Lets look at some of the recipes.

-Dips 22 recipes including:
harissa carrot and white bean dip
spicy ethiopian red lentil dip
black bean sopes
corn hummus with spicy corn relish
ecuadorian lupini bean ceviche (see pic)

-Salads 14 recipes including:
red gem salad with green curry goddess and crispy lentils
lady cream pea, sweet potato and charred okra salad
winter salad with cranberry beans, squash and pomegranate (see pic)

-Soup etc 28 recipes including:
georgian kidney bean stew with corn flatbreads and pickled cabbage
smoky black bean and plantain chili
red lentil ful with sumac roasted
cauliflower (see pic)

-Burgers etc 17 recipes including:
chickpea tarragon sandwiches
black bean chipotle falafel burgers
yellow bean and spinach dosas (see pic)

-Casseroles etc 26 recipes including:
orecchiette with borlotti beans, bitter greens and lemony breadcrumbs
Tofu Migas with black beans and nopales
crispy hoppin john with smoked tofu

-Drinks and desserts (yes, really!)
13 recipes including:
Plantain, black sesame and white bean quick bread
chocolate, red bean and rose brownies (see pic)
red bean icecream (see pic)
salty margarita sour with aquafaba

-Condiments etc 6 recipes including:
chickpea aioli
coconut cashew yoghurt
herb marinated tofu feta

Joe Yonan is the food editor at the Washington Post. In Cool Beans he has provided us with global vegetarian bean inspiration. Many of you, like myself are either cutting back on meat or trying to broaden an already meatless diet and are looking at ways to increase our intake of plant protein. For those of us, this book is a must have! With loads of gorgeous full page photographs and 125 unique and delicious sounding recipes I am feeling pretty inspired. Please check back. I will update this review as I cook from this book.

A little about me:
I have been known to taste test 10 different soy sauces in one sitting (not sure I want to repeat that experiment)
I recently purchased 9 different lemon zesters just to determine which one was best (you can view the results on my profile page)
I enjoy writing reviews and this hobby of mine gives me an outlet to share my culinary explorations.
If this review has been helpful to you would you please click the helpful button? I like to think that my reviews help filter out the crap for other like-minded buyers who are hunting for the same products that I am :)
It makes my day to see that my kitchen insanity helped a fellow customer.
You might also like to visit my profile page and check out some of my other ingredient and recipe book and kitchen tool reviews and idea lists. You can also click to follow me on my profile page to be notified when I post a new review.
Happy cooking (and eating)

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"Cool Beans!" Surely it's an expression to shout from your roof top once you start working with this book.

Rather than write a review the day after the book was published, it took me somewhat longer to work with some of the recipes here and formulate my thoughts. I’ve still not covered all the recipes that I’ve got marked, but I’ve made up my mind that this is a very worthy book. And, hey, don’t forget to browse through the “Look Inside” feature on this product page. Ten Speed Press always does a great job of giving you, ahead of time, a good indication of the quality of the cook book you are considering buying. And, by perusing the contents and index pages, you can see the titles of all the chapters and most, if not all, the recipe names, plus see all pertinent ingredients.

At the top of your list, “Good Reasons to Buy this Book”: It’s by Joe Yonan, a personable and true journalist who’s been with the Washington Post for a long time and who is dedicated to communication, teaching and learning. Personally, as I have most of his other cook books, and as I try to keep up with his Washington Post articles, I knew this book would be full of great material. And it is. If you don't believe me, and that's not enough to make you want to buy this book on beans, keep reading.

IT’S ALL ABOUT BEANS! “COOL BEANS”! Those two words are an exclamation that will always remind me of my daughter, cause’ that was a favorite saying of hers during her younger days. So I felt a connection with this book before I even opened its pages. And, it’s JUST about beans and veggies, because Yonan has eliminated meat from his diet. So, meat eaters be aware: If you can’t picture your beans without a ham hock or whatever, you will need to add meat and meat flavorings to the ingredient lists yourself. And that’s a simple thing to do. (I’m saying these recipes can easily be adapted to accommodate those families and cooks that are leaning away from meat, but who have not eliminated it from their diets.)

I was happy to see the great variety of beans represented in these recipes. (Although I personally found a few too many chickpea recipes.) So if you are anything like me--with a few burlap sacks from Dove Creek (Adobe Milling) sitting picturesquely in a corner, nestled next to a wicker basket filled with the latest Bean Club order from Rancho Gordo, and another basket of lady cream peas, baby green limas and gorgeously-colored kidney beans from Camellia—this is a book suited perfectly for you. Hey, it’s a book for all bean lovers, and all those with favorites, as Yonan includes dried, fresh, and canned beans, peas and lentils in his ingredient lists. And he includes alternatives in his instructions and tips, too.

Okay, so for the past few weeks I’ve been cooking beans almost every day it seems. And the house is always fragrant with what’s on the stove. Yonan does provide instructions for cooking them on the stove like I do. But, more importantly, because I’m not in the majority anymore, and Yonan gives instructions for pressure cooking and multi-cooker and Instant Pot cooking. (He uses a pressure cooker, I believe.) He covers all the different ideas and techniques for cooking consistently perfect beans—soft and creamy inside and with skins intact and not tough. He mentions Rancho Gordo and ATK and individual authors and cooks when discussing techniques brining, and using kombu, too.

And because this book has put me in the mood to cook multitudes of beans, having his chapters on salads and dips and snacks, plus his tips on freezing and storing, are preventing those cooked beans from building up in the frig. The dips in this book are so, so good—I’ll always be prepared for surprise visitors and healthy snacking with a few of these made up.

It still being wintertime, I’m delving more into the soup, stew, one dish and casserole recipes than into the chapter of salads. (Although there is a Christmas Lima, Kale and Tomato Salad that Ranch Gordo fans will be very happy with, and a Lady Cream Pea, Sweet Potato and Charred Okra Salad for the Camellia clientele.)

In my last Rancho Gordo Bean Club box, I got a package of a “prized”, hard-to-find, black beans called Santenera Negro Delgado. There is a very fine Smoky Black Bean and Plantain Chili. And if you need an introduction to using plantains (other than fried), this is the recipe to try. It will be a revelation! There’s another Cuban-Style black bean Stew-soup recipe with orange flavor, and that’s a great idea that I’ve not even seen in any of my Cuban cook books. But what I think is the BEST black bean recipe in this book? It’s the Salsa Madre, which they are calling “Black Bean Mother Sauce Puree”. And that is what I used my Santenera Negro Delgado beans to make. I will forever be grateful for the great timing of my Bean Club order and the publication of this book. It was an ideal opportunity to honor both the bean and the recipe.

I am a huge fan of Lady Cream Peas, fresh or dried. This one recipe alone--for Roasted Tomato and Pepper Soup--is worth the price of this book. I’ve salivated over many of the pictures in this book, but the idea of including Lady Cream Peas in a roasted tomato and pepper soup makes me crave it just thinking about it.

Oh, and speaking of pictures: For those of you who believe it matters, there is NOT A PICTURE for each recipe. There are 50 pictures of prepared beans, plus some other pictures of dried beans and beans cooking. There are about 125 recipes. Sure, I’d like to see more pictures, (especially for something hard to see in my mind's eye, like the skewers of mushrooms and gigante beans), but I think a lot of bean dishes would start looking a bit too similar after a while. And I bet someone, soon, will post a picture of that satay somewhere…… Plus, if I had to choose between a picture and a recipe--I'd choose another recipe every time!

Some unusual and worthy recipes: A White Bean Brandade Texas-Style Bowl O’ Red—beans, no meat and a spectacular Show-Stopping Whole Roasted Cauliflower (on a bed of contrasting-color hummus), and Rigatoni E Ceci (with chickpeas).

Some simple, worthy recipes: Marinated Lima Beans a vegan Southern Baked Beans Spicy Ethiopian Red Lentil Dip Chickpea Aioli, and a Salty Margarita Sour, (and plenty of info on aquafaba).

Some others worth noting, that I’d like to try before Spring arrives: Ratatouille Cassoulet and Root Vegetable, White Bean and Mushroom Cassoulet. There’s even a Chickpea and Quinoa Chorizo for those who strictly avoid meat.

I am very grateful to have this book now. There are not many good bean cook books out there, you know? And oftentimes—while I can make some pretty mouthwatering bean dishes with my usual basics (Working with great beans, how can you not make a great bean-based or one-bowl dinner?)—it still gets to be same old, same old. This book helps me out of that rut.


Keep Some Main Meal Components On Hand

Meal components are basically ingredients that can be combined in different ways to create a few different meals and main meal components are those that serve as the base for your meal.

Keep each of the following meal components on hand each week, for easy mix and match meals.

Complex Carbohydrates (choose 1 or 2)

cooked grains (i.e. rice, quinoa)

baked, steamed or roasted potatoes or sweet potatoes

Plant Based and/or Animal Proteins (choose 2 or 3 )

cooked beans and/or legumes (i.e. chickpeas, beans, lentils) - also complex carbs

ready to eat proteins (i.e. smoked salmon, smoked tofu, tuna)

Leafy Green & Other Non Starchy Vegetables (make plenty)

raw, steamed or roasted vegetables (i.e. carrots, beets, cauliflower, broccoli, asparagus, etc…)

ready to eat salad greens (i.e arugula, baby spinach, kale, etc…)

This might mean batch cooking a few of them once a week or intentionally making extra when preparing dinner, to eat as leftovers the next day or to repurpose them into another meal all together.

I personally don’t enjoy batch cooking, as it can take 2-4 hours and I’d rather spend my Sunday afternoons doing something else, so I often plan for extras that can be reused in different ways.

If I’m making rice with a vegetable curry, I’ll chop a few extra vegetables that I can add to my salads or grain bowls and make some extra rice that I can repurpose in a different meal throughout the week.

If I’m making a soup, stew or another freezer friendly meal like a ragù I’ll make a double batch and freeze half of it for a busy day in the future, when the time and motivation to cook is running low.

If I’m boiling eggs or roasting vegetables, I make more than I need and use them to top my salads and grain bowls throughout the week.

Keep in mind that some meal components can be purchased and don’t require any cooking or preparation: tuna, smoked salmon, smoked tofu, roasted chicken, canned beans, salad greens, and pre-cut vegetables are all available at most supermarkets and can be a great way to add variety to your meals if you have little time to spend on lunch time meal preparation.


Watch the video: Sumac Kuyllur u0026 Edison u0026 Jaime El Pastor Solitario. Москва. ВДНХ. (September 2021).