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Best Brown Sauce Recipes

Best Brown Sauce Recipes

Brown Sauce Shopping Tips

Staples of Asian cuisine such as ginger, daikon, rice vinegar, and spicy chile sauces like Sriracha add bright, fresh flavors without lots of fuss.

Brown Sauce Cooking Tips

Sriracha has good heat but also has flavor - its mild sweetness comes from sun-ripened chile peppers as well as sugar and garlic.


Brown sauce might not have an appetising name but it remains one of Britain&rsquos favourite condiments. No fry-up is complete without it, a sausage sandwich simply doesn&rsquot sing unless it's topped with a generous drizzle and a bacon butty is just sad with ketchup alone.

The classic recipe is thought to have been devised back in the 1800s, but now there are numerous variants. Tart, spicy and rich, its ingredients often include tomatoes, dates, molasses, apples, tamarind and vinegar.

The most popular &ndash and the original &ndash is HP Sauce. Its recipe was developed by Frederick Gibson Garton in the 1890s and it got the name HP Sauce as it was rumoured to have been used in a restaurant at the Houses of Parliament (an image of which still adorns the bottle today). He later sold the brand and recipe for just £150.

HPSauceUK/Facebook

Controversially, after Heinz bought HP Sauce in 2005, it secretly changed the recipe, reducing the salt content under pressure from government guidelines. This upset a number of customers including Marco Pierre White, who sent a dish back at The Hansom Cab in London, believing it was off after the change to the sauce.

Today, other popular brands include Daddies, Stokes and Tiptree.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 ½ pounds ground beef
  • ¾ cup fresh bread crumbs
  • ½ cup chili sauce
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup fresh sliced mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons minced onion
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).

In a large bowl, combine ground beef, bread crumbs, chili sauce, egg, salt, and freshly ground black pepper mix well. Shape into an 8x4 inch loaf pan.

Place loaf pan on a rack in an oven-roasting pan. Bake for 1 hour, or until done. Cook until internal temperature measures 160 degrees F (70 degrees C) the meat should be well done, with no trace of pink. Remove from oven, and allow to rest for 10 minutes before serving.

While the meatloaf is resting, prepare the gravy. In a medium saucepan, melt butter or margarine over medium heat. Add mushrooms and onions cook and stir until tender. Add beef broth simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Combine water and cornstarch in a small cup stir into broth. Cook and stir for 1 minute, or until thickened.


When all you want is a bowl of creamy pasta, adding a pile of golden-brown mushrooms makes it feel virtuous.

Recipes you want to make. Cooking advice that works. Restaurant recommendations you trust.

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Tips For How to Make Restaurant Quality Brown Sauce

As a home cook, one of the hardest things for me to accomplish when first starting out was making a rich velvety brown sauce to serve on steak, lamb, veal, pork, or even chicken.

I could put together a pretty good pan sauce using the dripping after sautéing or roasting a piece of meat but it never quite had that incredible intensity that I experience when dining out at a great restaurant.

My 5 Step Method for Preparing Professional Quality Brown Sauces

It wasn’t until I spent some time reading about sauce making and speaking with a few chef friends that I learned it isn’t so much the “how to” but the “ingredients” that make the difference. Using my 5-step method to making a great brown sauce is easy if you have all the necessary ingredients and I will give you some great resources for find them.

What is a Sauce?

According to Food Lover’s Companion, a sauce is “a thickened, flavored liquid designed to accompany food in order to enhance and bring out its flavor.” Now that can cover a lot of territory.

It goes on to say, “In the days before refrigeration, however, sauces were more often used to smother the taste of foods that had begun to go bad.” I’m sure we have all had experiences that have proven this true even in the days of refrigeration..Think back to your high school cafeteria.

But in the 19th century, the French created an intricate process for making sauces that is still being taught in cooking schools all over the world. This process involves numerous steps and if you have the time, I highly recommend James Peterson’s, “Sauces” and Raymond Sokolov’s “The Saucier’s Apprentice”. They are entirely devoted to just this subject.

Why is it so difficult to make great sauces at home?

As Chef Alton Brown says in his cookbook, I’m Just Here For The Food, “By and large, most home cooks don’t do sauce.and that’s too bad. Traditional sauces are indeed scary.”

The process just to prepare the key ingredients that go into a sauce takes a lot of time. It starts by making a stock with roasted beef and/or veal bones, reducing them for at least 12 hours, continuously skimming the pot,straining the liquid to remove the bones, reducing some more, adding a roux (a mixture of flour and water used as a thickening agent) and you now have a nice brown sauce or sauce espagnole.

A professional chef will then reduce this brown sauce further to make a demi glace, the mother of all sauces. These guys spend a lot of time in cooking school learning how to do this and take great pride in the sauces they can make with it. These stock reductions are the foundation to hundreds of classic sauces being served in fine restaurants.

Why can’t I just use a bouillon cube?

Unless you want to ruin an expensive cut of meat by covering it with a salty, corn syrup reduction, I would stay away from bouillon cubes or any of those cheap packets of instant sauces you see in your local supermarket.

Just look at the ingredients to see if what’s inside is real or simply processed. You can’t build a sound house without a strong foundation. The same is true when making sauces.

What’s a home cook to do?

Since making a great sauce at home depends of finding a good stock reduction or demi glace, I would like to offer you the following resources.

Make it yourself. A great experience but one most of us will not take on.

Make friends with the chef at your favorite upper end restaurant and see if he or she will share some of their brown gold with you. Be prepared to beg or pay through the nose to get them to part with this stuff. Not likely, but worth a try. ‘

Hire a personal chef to make it for you. You may end up having to subscribe to years worth of dinners, which isn’t all that bad, but you will have your demi.

Buy it a high-end gourmet store. If you really search hard, you may be able to find stock reductions in the refrigerator section of some really high end stores. You won’t get much, but you don’t need a lot and it won’t be cheap.

Williams-Sonoma is now selling their own stock reductions. I have not had that much experience with them but they usually sell high quality items.

Find demi glace and stock reductions that are used in high-end restaurants and are available to home cooks. There are several good commercial brands on the market now to make it easier to prepare gourmet sauces just like they do in high end restaurants.

My Top Choices for Demi Glace

Online Sources: Demi Glace

For those of you who do not want to make demi glace at home.

Demi glace is the most important ingredient for making classic "restaurant quality" brown sauces. All the great French brown sauces use demi glace. But it can also be used in soups, stews and braises. It's something you can make at home but it takes a long, long time to do it right and if you make one mistake, it can easily be ruined. Lucky for us, there are now some great sources for commercial grade demi glace and I want to share a few with you now. Everyone has their preferences so I suggest you give each a try to find out which product you like best. Savory Choice's Demi Glace

Ready in minutes, Savory Choice beef demi glace allows home chefs to deliver impressive restaurant-quality meals quickly and cost-effectively. Professional chefs typically take at least 24 hours to prepare this traditional reduction sauce by simmering stock, vegetables, wine and spices to a velvety consistency. One of my first commercial demi glace products and still one of my favorites. For almost 25 years, More Than Gourmet has been the gold standard for flavor and quality when it comes to sauces, stock, and soup. This product comes in 1 pound tubs and 1.5 ounce pucks and even bigger sizes if you are a commercial establishment. I like buying 6 of the pucks at a time unless I'm doing a big party and need the pounder.

My Quick & Easy 5 Step Method Quick Look

Sauté a shallot in butter.

More Details

Sauté a chopped shallot or small onion in one ounce of butter (1/4 stick) for 1-2 minutes until translucent in a saute pan.

Deglaze with 1/2-cup red wine and reduce to an essence (approximately one tablespoon of remaining liquid). Be sure to remove the pan from the heat before deglazing.

Reduce the sauce until it is thick enough to coat a spoon.

Season with freshly ground pepper to taste.

One last item that is optional but often used by professional chefs is a pat of butter. It adds a bit more flavor and shine to the finished sauce.

Alternatives

At this point you have a delicious sauce that you can serve or use as a base and layer in more flavors by adding additional ingredients including fresh herbs and spices, fruits, chutneys, relish, or cream.

If you are adding mushrooms or other ingredients that need to cook a bit, add them to the pan right after you add the wine and let them cook while the wine is reducing.

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I'm a work-at-home dad who enjoys cooking, learning everything I can about the culinary world and sharing it with you. To learn more about me. Read More…


Quick Brown Sauce

This versatile sauce is a version of the classic French brown sauce, which forms the basis for many of the classic French dishes. Making a traditional beef stock is time-consuming, however, and requires several procedures, including the long simmering of beef bones, vegetables, and herbs. James Beard worked out this recipe over a number of years, and felt that it combined the taste of the classic with the ease of the modern. Use it as a base for his Sauce Diable.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 shallots, finely chopped
  • 1 cup dry red wine
  • One 10 1/2-ounce can beef broth
  • Pinch of dried thyme
  • 3 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • Salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Method

Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed 1 1/2-quart saucepan. Add the shallots and sauté over medium heat until limp and golden. Stir in the wine and beef broth and bring to a boil. Season with thyme and cook over high heat until the liquid is reduced by almost half.

While the liquid is reducing, work the butter and flour together to a paste with your fingers and then roll it into tiny balls, called beurre manié. Drop the balls, one or two at a time, into the boiling liquid, and cook, stirring constantly with a whisk until the sauce is thickened to your liking. Don&rsquot add all the beurre manié at once as it will take a little time to break up and thicken the liquid.

Season to taste with salt and pepper, then pour the sauce through a strainer to eliminate the bits of cooked shallot.


Brown sauce recipe

Sweet with dates and molasses, sour with tamarind and malt vinegar, and gently spiced, this brown sauce recipe complements meat and cuts through rich dishes. No breakfast is complete without it.

Before you start cooking, read more about the history of brown sauce and get prepared with a couple of glass jars or sauce bottles.

Ingredients

  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 0.5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 800 g tomatoes (tinned)
  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 125 g dates (chopped)
  • 2 Granny Smith apples (peeled and cored)
  • 75 g dark brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp treacle
  • 175 ml malt vinegar
  • 2 tbsp tamarind pulp
  • 2 tsp Worcester sauce
  • 2 tsp mustard powder
  • 1 pinch sea salt
  • 1 tbsp oil, for frying
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 0.5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 28.2 oz tomatoes (tinned)
  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 4.4 oz dates (chopped)
  • 2 Granny Smith apples (peeled and cored)
  • 2.6 oz dark brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp treacle
  • 6.2 fl oz malt vinegar
  • 2 tbsp tamarind pulp
  • 2 tsp Worcester sauce
  • 2 tsp mustard powder
  • 1 pinch sea salt
  • 1 tbsp oil, for frying
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 0.5 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 28.2 oz tomatoes (tinned)
  • 1 onion (finely chopped)
  • 4.4 oz dates (chopped)
  • 2 Granny Smith apples (peeled and cored)
  • 2.6 oz dark brown sugar
  • 3 tbsp treacle
  • 0.7 cup malt vinegar
  • 2 tbsp tamarind pulp
  • 2 tsp Worcester sauce
  • 2 tsp mustard powder
  • 1 pinch sea salt
  • 1 tbsp oil, for frying

Details

  • Cuisine: British
  • Recipe Type: Condiment
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Preparation Time: 30 mins
  • Cooking Time: 60 mins
  • Serves: 3

Step-by-step

  1. Soak the tamarind in enough boiling water to cover it for half an hour. Mash it and then strain through a sieve. Save the water.
  2. Heat the oil over a medium heat, add the finely chopped onion and sauté for five minutes until softening but not brown.
  3. Add the remaining ingredients, except the sea salt, and allow to cook for one hour.
  4. Blend the sauce and season to taste with sea salt.
  5. If you want your sauce to be smooth like shop-bought brown sauce, pass it through a sieve.
  6. Sterilise your bottles by putting them through a hot dishwasher cycle or by heating them through in a 180°C (250°F) oven for 20 minutes.
  7. Let the sauce cool down and add cold sauce to cold bottles. Cover and store in the fridge for up to a month.

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The World-Famous Hot Brown

INGREDIENTSMakes Two Hot Browns

  • 2 oz. Whole Butter
  • 2 oz. All Purpose Flour
  • 8 oz. Heavy Cream
  • 8 oz. Whole Milk
  • ½ Cup of Pecorino Romano Cheese
    Plus 1 Tablespoon for Garnish
  • Pinch of Ground Nutmeg
  • Salt and Pepper to Taste
  • 14 oz. Sliced Roasted Turkey Breast, Slice Thick
  • 4 Slices of Texas Toast (Crust Trimmed)
  • 4 Slices of Crispy Bacon
  • 2 Roma Tomatoes, Sliced in Half
  • Paprika
  • Parsley

In a two‑quart saucepan, melt butter and slowly whisk in flour until combined and forms a thick paste (roux). Continue to cook roux for two minutes over medium‑low heat, stirring frequently. Whisk heavy cream and whole milk into the roux and cook over medium heat until the cream begins to simmer, about 2‑3 minutes. Remove sauce from heat and slowly whisk in Pecorino Romano cheese until the Mornay sauce is smooth. Add nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste.

For each Hot Brown, place two slices of toast with the crusts cut off in an oven safe dish – one slice is cut in half corner to corner to make two triangles and the other slice is left in a square shape - then cover with 7 ounces of turkey. Take the two halves of Roma tomato and two toast points and set them alongside the base of the turkey and toast. Next, pour one half of the Mornay sauce to completely cover the dish. Sprinkle with additional Pecorino Romano cheese. Place the entire dish in the oven. Suggested bake time is 20 minutes at 350º. When the cheese begins to brown and bubble, remove from oven, cross two pieces of crispy bacon on top, sprinkle with paprika and parsley, and serve immediately.


How to store? Store sauce leftovers in a glass jar with a lid in the refrigerator for up to 4 or 5 days.

Make it spicier or less spicy: If you love spicy Chinese (or Asian) food, simply increase the amount of red pepper flakes. You can also use fresh chilis or add a little hot sauce or Sriracha to taste! If you are sensitive to spicy food or have a toddler/kid, then leave out the red pepper flakes and use less fresh ginger.

Vegetable oil: You can use canola oil or any vegetable cooking oil of choice.

Sweetener: I used maple syrup, however, any other sweetener is fine. Some examples are agave syrup, brown rice syrup, or date syrup. You can also use regular sugar to taste.

Cornstarch: If you have a corn allergy, simply use arrowroot flour, tapioca flour/starch, or potato starch. Any starch is fine and will thicken the sauce.

Soy sauce: I used gluten-free dark soy sauce. You can also use a combination of light soy sauce and dark soy sauce. Make sure to use tamari (or a gluten-free soy sauce) if you are a celiac. If you want a soy-free alternative then I would recommend using coconut aminos.

This Szechuan Sauce Is:

  • Vegan
  • Can be made gluten-free
  • A little spicy
  • Sweet, sour & salty
  • Satisfying
  • Hearty
  • Easy to make with simple ingredients
  • Ready in less than 10 minutes
  • Can be made oil-free

Should you give this Chinese garlic sauce recipe a try, please leave a comment below, and don’t forget to tag me in your Instagram or Facebook post with @elavegan #elavegan because I love to see your remakes!

If you love Asian food, definitely also check out the following delicious vegan recipes:


Watch the video: Αυτή είναι η πιο διάσημη ιταλική σάλτσα τομάτας -Και χρειάζεται μόνο τρία υλικά (November 2021).