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Beyoncé’s 8 Craziest Diets

Beyoncé’s 8 Craziest Diets

Spicy maple-syrup lemonade, salt water flushes, and non-stop workouts: the secrets behind Beyoncé’s body

DFree / Shutterstock

The secret behind Beyoncé's flawless body is some seriously intense dieting.

Beyoncé never fails to look flawless. Whether she’s performing on stage in a leotard and glittering tights, posing in a bikini, or stepping out on to the red carpet in a see-through ball-gown, her figure is the source of sever bouts of body-envy from women all over the world.

Beyoncé’s 8 Craziest Diets (Slideshow)

However, Beyoncé is always the first to explain that her figure doesn’t come to her easily. Every. Single. Day.

Her regular daily diet seems crazy enough to us. The strict regime consists of eating many small meals every day, small meals which consist of lean protein and vegetables. There’s no sign of any carbs or sugar sneaking into her everyday menu. Maybe she’s full from all the water she drinks: The idea of drinking one gallon of water with lemon every day, as she does, is enough to make us feel rather nauseous. Perhaps we could follow this diet for a week, but not forever. We certainly can’t imagine having any energy to do anything but sleep when following this regime, which is far from what Beyoncé’s days look like.

In a normal week, Beyoncé does around 70 hours of exercise. That’s more time than you spend at work, and more time than you spend asleep. She trains with celebrity trainer Marco Borges five days a week, doing cardio and weights, takes a yoga class once a week, and practices choreography for up to nine hours at a time almost every day. After a day like that she goes home and eats some steamed fish and vegetables. Honestly, we just can’t understand.

You’d have thought that that would be enough to keep her in tip-top shape all year round, but Beyoncé is nothing if not a perfectionist. On top of her regular crazy diet, Beyoncé goes through intense weeks of following the most unbelievable diets. She’s a loyal subscriber to the Master Cleanse diet, which consists of giving up all food and drink apart from a spicy lemonade concoction for days at a time; she swears that it’s easy to drop several pounds by going vegan for 22 days; and she took on an intense high-protein program to lose her pregnancy weight in 2012. We now understand why we’ll never look like Queen B.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Beyonce's 22-Day Vegan Diet: I Tried It and Lost 8 Pounds

Weight loss aside, avoiding meat, dairy, soy and gluten had a big impact.

Beyonce's Vegan Diet Challenge to Fans

— -- My family celebrates major milestones by going to steakhouses and ordering as though we'll never eat again.

Over the past decade or so, we’ve been especially lucky: I’ve sung "Happy Birthday" to my brother at Peter Luger Steak House and the Palm in New York City, where I live. I’ve toasted my parents’ wedding anniversary at the Precinct in my hometown of Cincinnati, Ohio. I marked my college graduation at Gibsons in Chicago and my sister’s at St. Elmo in Indianapolis.

To me, a gluttonous steak dinner with salads smothered in blue cheese dressing, loaded baked potatoes and bottles of red wine signifies that life is good.

I've always assumed that celebrities do not eat like this, even on happy occasions, and that's how they stay so slim. After all, life is full of trade-offs. But after Beyoncé showed up to the Met Gala looking like this, I admit, I was curious: How can a human being look like that? What does someone have to do to achieve that kind of body?

Here's the answer: She has worked with exercise physiologist Marco Borges for years and even penned the forward to his new book, “The 22-Day Revolution.” Borges advocates for a plant-based diet and believes that if it takes 21 days to change a habit, devotees need to go vegan and alcohol-free for 22 days. He also suggests avoiding soy and gluten.

It's restrictive, yes, but according to Beyoncé, who launched a prepared food line with Borges earlier this year, it works. So, in the name of journalism -- and swimsuit season -- I agreed to give it a whirl.

To do this challenge, I had two choices: I could order the prepared meals from Borges and Beyoncé or make them myself. I went the latter route for a few reasons, but mainly because I didn’t think that microwaving my food would lead to healthier habits in the long run. (It was also because three meals a day for three weeks would have cost about $600.)

I quickly learned the DIY route wasn’t cheap either. I forked over $200 during my first trip to the grocery store. Among my purchases were a $9 jar of almond butter and an equally expensive tin of tahini that remains unopened. Borges recommends organic produce for the “dirty dozen," including apples, cherry tomatoes, and bell peppers, and while I balked at the $14 organic grapes, I mostly complied.

With a fridge full of fresh produce and a cabinet stocked with roughly 12,000 kinds of beans, I felt ready to go. Three weeks later and eight pounds lighter, I can report that Beyoncé was mostly telling the truth about this diet. Here's what I mean:

“I thought . I would feel deprived and hate food, that I would miss out on restaurants and celebrations, that I would get headaches and be irritable, etc. I was wrong about all of that.” - Beyoncé

This is half-true. At first I did feel deprived and I did hate food. Most of all, I hated myself for agreeing to do this experiment. Who did I think I was? Without a moral leg to stand on, it felt overwhelming. What vegan wears leather?!

"Beyoncé is a liar," I declared to anybody who would listen. The problem for me was the pressure to follow the meal plan outlined in the book. There was no way that I could balance my career, a social life and my other obligations with cooking dinner, preparing breakfast and whipping up lunch to bring to the office all at once. I nearly threw the book across the room when one lunch recipe required homemade cashew cheese. Side note: You’re also supposed to work out every day, rotating cardio and stretching with resistance training. Good luck with all of that.

I vented to my friend Tracey Lemle, a certified health coach who runs Kale with a Side of Fries. One way to approach it, she suggested, was to think about what I wanted to eat and find a recipe in the book that would satisfy that craving. Stick to the tenets of the diet, but make it work for you, she said. This is supposed to be fun.

It may have been a violation of the rules, but it helped: If I wanted Mexican, there were walnut tacos. (One friend declared that they looked like "a nightmare," but I loved them.) Thai? Vegetable curry. Italian? Gluten-free pasta. The trick involved eating making lunch the heartiest meal -- a challenge for someone like me, who tends to make salads a side at dinner rather than the main event.

Still, things improved dramatically once I let myself relax, and the weight kept falling off anyway. Previously a cereal devotee, I loved the breakfasts most of all, especially granola (instead of making my own, I splurged on Early Bird's Jubilee brand), almond butter on toast with berries, and juices, which I made at home.


Watch the video: Beyoncé Greatest Hits - The Very Best Of Beyoncé -Beyoncé Best Songs Full Album 2021 (November 2021).