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10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do with Peanut Butter Slideshow

10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do with Peanut Butter Slideshow

The possibilities reach far beyond a bland PB&J

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Gone are the days where peanut butter can only be used as a smear for bread or bananas. Peanut butter is a go-to condiment for the base of dressings, marinades, and dipping sauces. You can use peanut butter to dress everything from poultry, to noodles, to satay. Let us not forget peanut butter as a key ingredient in comfort food desserts. Many a childhood memory is laced with visuals of fork tines indenting peanut butter cookies or plunging into the decadence of a traditional southern peanut butter pie.

Often found in smoothies or paired with apples or celery, peanut butter is a protein-packed, healthy snack for kids and adults alike. Here’s the kicker though: Your health isn't the only thing that could benefit from eating peanut butter. Your skin and the texture of your hair improves with topical application of the nut butter. The smooth treat can also help repair scratches on your household surfaces and appliances. This edible, all-utility spread wears many hats as a cleanser, bait, lubricant, shaving cream, and so much more.

Peanut butter is fairly cheap and found in every supermarket and drugstore. It’s not just a must-have staple for the home cook. It’s a must-have staple for the home, period. Creamy or chunky, savory or sweet, you’d be nuts (yes, I went there) to not see the versatility of peanut butter.

Soni Satpathy also contributed to this story.

10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do with Peanut Butter

istockphoto.com

Gone are the days where peanut butter can only be used as a smear for bread or bananas. Creamy or chunky, savory or sweet, you’d be nuts (yes, I went there) to not see the versatility of peanut butter.

Soni Satpathy also contributed to this story.

Smoother Skin

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Whether you desire a clean, close shave for your face or your legs, peanut butter is a great gender neutral cream to help keep nicks at bay and help you maintain your post shave sheen. You don’t want to use a crunchy peanut butter as the texture will be abrasive. A creamy peanut butter works wonders. The oil in the peanut butter serves as a natural moisturizer for the skin. Simply apply as you would a shave gel or cream and shave away.

Lustrous Hair

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Move over expensive keratin hair oils. A little peanut butter goes a long way for healthy, shiny locks. Massage a small amount into your scalp and remove with shampoo.

Leather Furniture Polish

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Give yourself and your furniture the luster it deserves. Work a dollop of smooth peanut butter in a circular motion on furniture surface and wipe away with a soft cloth. A drop of perfumed oil in the peanut butter will help eliminate an overwhelming peanut butter smell.

Wood Polish

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Scratches in furniture are almost completely eliminated with this trick: gently rub smooth peanut butter into the wood surface. Allow it to rest for an hour and use a buffering cloth for wiping.

DVD/CD Repair

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Application of creamy peanut butter on a scratched CD/DVD will eliminate skipping. Be sure to wipe the peanut butter off the surface with a dry, soft cloth. That is, if you still use CD's instead of your smartphone.

Insect Bait

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Some countries eat these creatures, but if you're anything like us you don't want them lurking in your kitchen. Mixing peanut butter with borax and leaving it on a plastic lid or disposable surface will attract ants and roaches. They’ll get stuck in the peanut butter and in one final swoop, you can discard the lid with critters.

Mice Bait

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Tom and Jerry made us believe that a wedge of cheese perched on a mousetrap is a surefire way in trapping a mouse. In reality however, peanut butter is the preferred food of choice for mice. Simply place peanut butter on the trap and you’ll soon catch your unwanted guest.

Elimination of Squeaks

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No, we’re not still talking about getting rid of squeaking mice. Peanut butter works on squeaks from inanimate objects, too. Save a trip to the hardware store and instead rely on peanut butter’s oils to lubricate squeaky drawers and hinges.

Tool Lubricant

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Tools such as saws and lawn blades get their second wind from peanut butter. The oils help in working as a natural lubricant for all your tools.

Gum Removal

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Whether its gum stuck in your hair, in your carpet, or on the bottom of your shoe, peanut butter will help remove it in a jiffy! Place the peanut butter over gum, let it sit, and then remove with a cloth. Getting gum stuck is gross, but chewing it could actually really be good for you. If you're not sure which stick to choose, here's our opinions from our ultimate chewing gum taste test!


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.


9 Nut and Seed Butters People With Peanut Allergies Actually Love

If you have a peanut allergy, you're probably well aware that peanut butter can't be a part of your life. Thankfully, there are actually a bunch of great alternatives that are equally delicious and completely peanut-free.

Before we get into the options, though, it's important to note that not all peanut butter alternatives are safe for people with peanut allergies. Peanut allergies can range from extremely severe and life-threatening to pretty mild, Tania Elliott, M.D., an allergist and immunologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. In a lot of cases, just the smallest amount of peanut dust can be enough to set off a reaction, she says. Having a peanut allergy doesn't automatically mean that you're also allergic to tree nuts like almonds or walnuts—peanuts are technically legumes, not nuts—though 30 percent of people with peanut allergies are also allergic to tree nuts, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. (If you think you might have a food allergy, always see an allergist to get properly diagnosed.)

The problem is that many other nut-based products could be cross-contaminated. So even if you're only allergic to peanuts, simply avoiding them doesn't guarantee you'll be safe, says Elliott. Many packaged foods in general can be dangerous for people with peanut allergies because they're frequently processed in facilities where peanuts are also processed, so you constantly have to be checking labels to make sure you're not eating a trace amount. According to the Mayo Clinic, "most people with a peanut allergy need to avoid all products that could contain even trace amounts of peanuts," but it's important to speak with your allergist to confirm what is and isn't safe for you.

So because many alternative nut and seed butters, even if they don't contain any actual peanuts, are frequently processed in the same facilities, it's important to always check the labels and if you're not sure if a product may contain trace amounts of peanuts, it's best to skip it to be safe.

To help you find some options, we asked people with peanut allergies to share the 100 percent peanut-free spreads they actually eat. Made with a range of ingredients, from watermelon seeds to soy beans, their textures and flavors are similar to peanut butter and delicious in their own unique way. Important note: These nut and seed butters aren't necessarily free of other allergens, such as soy and tree nuts. Again, if you are not sure what you are allergic to, or if you are allergic to other seeds, nuts, or legumes besides peanuts, always read the labels and speak with your allergist before trying any of the below foods.