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How to Arrange Summer Flowers

How to Arrange Summer Flowers

Simple tips for creating a beautiful arrangement for your table

How to Arrange Summer Flowers

During my June beach vacation, I begged my husband Drew’s 89-year-old grandmother, Ruthmary, to give me a flower arranging lesson. Roo-Roo, as us “kids” call her, is the type of Southern woman you read about in best-selling beach novels. She is an amazing cook, gardener, and charitable figure in her community, yet she drinks bourbon with grace and cracks the wittiest jokes of anyone I know. Her flower arrangements are legendary in her hometown of Wilson, N.C. and now we can all learn from her years of experience.

What You Need:

• A selection of flowers. For this arrangement, Roo-Roo chose blue hydrangeas and gardenias from her home along with some paler pink and white lace-top and shooting star hydrangeas for visual and textural interest.

• Greenery, if desired, for anchoring

• Clippers, for trimming stems

• A vase (and water)

• Newspaper, for covering the table

• Floral wire, if desired, for propping up any droopy, delicate buds

Sarah and Lydia have been helping clients with entertaining needs both big and small, turning inspirational ideas into real experiences that friends and family will always treasure. For more tips and entertaining ideas, visit their site at Apples & Onions.


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


How to Dry Flowers

This simple and gorgeous DIY is the perfect addition to your home décor.

Drying flowers for the purpose of preservation has been around since ancient times. In fact, there&aposs evidence of preserving blooms dating back all the way to the Egyptians who used them to decorate tombs. Not only do dried flowers create a beautiful decoration, but they can also serve as a meaningful keepsake𠅊 way to cherish a wedding bouquet or boutonniere for years to come. "The process of drying flowers involves transitioning them from a fresh lithe state of being to a brittle state of permanence," explains Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers. In other words, to dry flowers is to let all of the water evaporate.

But not all flowers dry well, so it&aposs important to choose your blooms wisely. "Roses, of course, are one of the most popular and easy-to-dry varieties, but there are many other great options such as hydrangeas and peonies that also make beautiful dried focal flowers," says Joan Wyndrum, florist and founder of wholesale flower company, Blooms by the Box. "For added texture, you can use a number of &aposfiller&apos flowers, like baby&aposs breath, statice, solidago, and brunia."


Watch the video: FLOWER ARRANGEMENT HACKS (November 2021).