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Beyond Pie: 10 Great Pumpkin Recipes

Beyond Pie: 10 Great Pumpkin Recipes

Make the most out of pumpkins this year

Go beyond pie with some of these pumpkin recipes.

Pumpkin pie is a Thanksgiving classic and tables across America are filled with the fall favorite each year. Although pumpkin pie is a must on Turkey Day, there are many other delicious pumpkin recipes to satisfy your pumpkin craving while you wait for the traditional dessert. The Cook editors here at The Daily Meal want to ensure that you make the most out of pumpkins this year — and that means going beyond pie.

Unlike in the time-honored pie, pumpkins can also be used in many savory dishes. Try a pumpkin-stuffed chicken breast for an inventive new way to serve a dinner favorite. There are also pumpkin chowders and soups that deliver superb pumpkin flavor in warm and savory ways. Or try pumpkin for breakfast with pumpkin oatmeal bars or cream cheese pumpkin spread for bagels and toast.

So, while we wait anxiously for a slice of the customary pie, make some of these pumpkin recipes in the days leading up to the holiday. Try making your own pumpkin purée with a fresh pumpkin or simply use the canned version for a quick and easy alternative.

Move over apples, there’s a new king of fall in town that has kids and adults alike flocking to the farms. Pumpkins are for more than carving and their cooking uses go far beyond pie. Check out these recipes and fill your home (and stomachs) with these new non-pie pumpkin recipes.

Emily Jacobs is the Recipe editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @EmilyRecipes.


Recipe: Perfect pumpkin pie

Allotments have become quite trendy in recent years. Having an allotment was typically a hobby of your grandparents, who would always hand you a bag of 'goodies' from their garden whether you wanted it or not.

However, in recent years there has been a surge in the younger generation taking a keen interest in growing their own fruit and vegetables.

When I was younger, my parents had a vegetable area put aside in the bottom of the garden and one of the first fruits they produced successfully was pumpkins - that's right, a pumpkin is actually a fruit often mistaken for a vegetable.

We had lots and lots of pumpkins. In fact, we had so much that my mum had to become extremely creative in the kitchen to ensure they didn't go to waste. Mum's staples were pumpkin soup, pasta and stew.

I absolutely love pumpkins (I'm quite nostalgic like that), but they're very versatile. Great baked in a salad with seeds, lemon and olive oil, they also make vibrant purées that are silky smooth.

My favourite method of using them is for pumpkin pie - sadly, not as popular here as in the USA, where it's a traditional dish served at Thanksgiving.


Beyond Pie: 10 Great Pumpkin Recipes - Recipes

Submitted by: Nancy Kamooneh

Great gluten-free pumpkin muffin recipe! Really bakes up pretty nice and makes a great hit with everyone.

Ingredients

1/4 c. pumpkin puree, canned

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 10 cups of a muffin tin - natural parchment muffin papers work best.

Whisk the eggs, pumpkin, melted coconut oil (can substitute butter), vanilla extract, and maple syrup (can substitute honey) together in a large mixing bowl. Sift in the coconut flour, sea salt, baking soda, and pumpkin pie spice and stir until well combined. Gently fold in the cranberries.

In a muffin tin, scoop ¼ cup of the batter into each lined muffin cup, and bake for 35-40 minutes.

Want to change it up? Add chopped walnuts and/or semi-sweet chocolate chips to the mixture before baking or place some on top. For bulkier muffins, add 3 cups of shredded carrots to the mixture before baking. Also, if you prefer to replace the sweetener (maple syrup/honey) with a mashed green-tipped banana.


Our Best Recipes Series

Our Best Recipes Series continues with this collection of 8 great pumpkin recipes. (Psst&hellip if you missed my previous collection of our best ground beef recipes, make sure to check it out.) As I mentioned before, I am working with my friends Megan, Liz and Leah to bring you this series of our go-to recipes. (Psst&hellip make sure to sign up for my newsletter so you don&rsquot ever miss a post in this series.)

Other posts in this series you may have missed:



4 Delicious Holiday Pie Recipes

Best Thanksgiving Pie Recipes

How to Make a Pie: Crusts.

15 Favorite Pumpkin Recipes: Both.

Favorite Fall Recipes

Best Thanksgiving Dinner Recipes

Comfort Food Recipes from The Old.

Best Sweet Potato Recipes

10 Best No-Cook Recipes

Apple Recipes: 15 Favorites for.

15 Warm and Cozy Comfort Food.

Fourth of July Recipes


10 Great Butternut Squash Recipes for Fall & Winter

Published: Oct 11, 2016 · Updated: Apr 7, 2021 by Nicole @ VegKitchen · This post may contain affiliate links.

There are lots of colorful, beautiful varieties of winter squash on the market in the fall and winter. I love to look at them, and they make festive centerpieces for the seasonal table. But when it comes to choosing one to eat, I go for butternut almost every time. Sure, it’s not as pretty to look at as some of the others, but for flavor, texture, and versatility, it can’t be beat. It's especially good in soups, and you'll find three tasty choices following. First, we highly recommend you visit How to Cut a Butternut Squash Without Losing Your Mind. Then you’ll be set for these 10 great ways to use this classic cool-weather vegetable.

Once you’ve got the butternut squash baked, Coconut Butternut Squash Soup With a Garnish of Greens (shown at top) comes together quickly. The mellow flavors of coconut milk, kale, and red onions synergies delectably with the squash, and look gorgeous together as well. It’s a fantastic first course for a Thanksgiving dinner, but you need not wait for a special occasion to enjoy it.

Mellow Butternut Squash Smoothie tastes like a liquid version of a delicious pumpkin pie — the secret being that butternut squash makes better pumpkin pie than pumpkin itself does. Gently spiced with cinnamon and ginger, this smoothie is packed with flavor and gives you a generous dose of vitamins A and C. It might well become your go-to fall and winter smoothie!

Once you’ve got the squash baked, this warming Miso Butternut Squash Soup comes together quickly. Filled with noodles and colorful and nutritious veggies, it’s as pleasing to the eye as it is to the palate.

Even those of us who have given up the bird welcome a Thanksgiving dish that has been stuffed. Butternut Squash with Whole Wheat, Wild Rice, and Onion Stuffing makes a handsome centerpiece for the holiday meal.

Thai Red Curry with Winter Squash, Mushrooms, and Broccoli is a fusion-style dish by Jill Nussinow. Winter squash (here, we prefer butternut) pairs well with Thai curry. The mushrooms add earthiness and a lot of texture, while the broccoli (or greens) adds freshness.


Smooth, sweet butternut puree tastes just as good as sugar pumpkin in Easy Vegan Pumpkin or Squash Pie—perhaps even better! Once you’ve got the squash or pumpkin baked, which I do ahead of time, making this nourishing pie is a snap. It contains no eggs or dairy, of course, but no one will notice!

Squash, Sweet Potato, and Corn Chowder is perfect for fall. Though this admittedly involves a bit of preparation, none of it is difficult. It’s a great soup to make on a quiet Sunday — you’ll be happy to come home to it during the week! It’s delicious with fresh cornbread.

Pumpkin or Squash Mini-Loaves make a nice gift to bring when you visit friends and relatives over the winter holidays they’re also an easy everyday treat, full of nutritious ingredients, to make and enjoy at home. I think they're especially good made with butternut, of course.

With a subtle hint of soy sauce and maple syrup, Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash is a simple recipe that's positively addictive. It’s a nice addition to everyday or holiday winter meals. You can vary it by using other squashes.

Three Sisters Stew is a great main dish option for Thanksgiving dinner, but you can use it throughout the fall and winter. It’s somewhat like chili, though more about the squash than beans. If you bake your butternut squash or pumpkin or squash a day ahead, the stew will come together in a snap.


10 Great Butternut Squash Recipes for Fall & Winter

Published: Oct 11, 2016 · Updated: Apr 7, 2021 by Nicole @ VegKitchen · This post may contain affiliate links.

There are lots of colorful, beautiful varieties of winter squash on the market in the fall and winter. I love to look at them, and they make festive centerpieces for the seasonal table. But when it comes to choosing one to eat, I go for butternut almost every time. Sure, it’s not as pretty to look at as some of the others, but for flavor, texture, and versatility, it can’t be beat. It's especially good in soups, and you'll find three tasty choices following. First, we highly recommend you visit How to Cut a Butternut Squash Without Losing Your Mind. Then you’ll be set for these 10 great ways to use this classic cool-weather vegetable.

Once you’ve got the butternut squash baked, Coconut Butternut Squash Soup With a Garnish of Greens (shown at top) comes together quickly. The mellow flavors of coconut milk, kale, and red onions synergies delectably with the squash, and look gorgeous together as well. It’s a fantastic first course for a Thanksgiving dinner, but you need not wait for a special occasion to enjoy it.

Mellow Butternut Squash Smoothie tastes like a liquid version of a delicious pumpkin pie — the secret being that butternut squash makes better pumpkin pie than pumpkin itself does. Gently spiced with cinnamon and ginger, this smoothie is packed with flavor and gives you a generous dose of vitamins A and C. It might well become your go-to fall and winter smoothie!

Once you’ve got the squash baked, this warming Miso Butternut Squash Soup comes together quickly. Filled with noodles and colorful and nutritious veggies, it’s as pleasing to the eye as it is to the palate.

Even those of us who have given up the bird welcome a Thanksgiving dish that has been stuffed. Butternut Squash with Whole Wheat, Wild Rice, and Onion Stuffing makes a handsome centerpiece for the holiday meal.

Thai Red Curry with Winter Squash, Mushrooms, and Broccoli is a fusion-style dish by Jill Nussinow. Winter squash (here, we prefer butternut) pairs well with Thai curry. The mushrooms add earthiness and a lot of texture, while the broccoli (or greens) adds freshness.


Smooth, sweet butternut puree tastes just as good as sugar pumpkin in Easy Vegan Pumpkin or Squash Pie—perhaps even better! Once you’ve got the squash or pumpkin baked, which I do ahead of time, making this nourishing pie is a snap. It contains no eggs or dairy, of course, but no one will notice!

Squash, Sweet Potato, and Corn Chowder is perfect for fall. Though this admittedly involves a bit of preparation, none of it is difficult. It’s a great soup to make on a quiet Sunday — you’ll be happy to come home to it during the week! It’s delicious with fresh cornbread.

Pumpkin or Squash Mini-Loaves make a nice gift to bring when you visit friends and relatives over the winter holidays they’re also an easy everyday treat, full of nutritious ingredients, to make and enjoy at home. I think they're especially good made with butternut, of course.

With a subtle hint of soy sauce and maple syrup, Soy and Maple-Glazed Winter Squash is a simple recipe that's positively addictive. It’s a nice addition to everyday or holiday winter meals. You can vary it by using other squashes.

Three Sisters Stew is a great main dish option for Thanksgiving dinner, but you can use it throughout the fall and winter. It’s somewhat like chili, though more about the squash than beans. If you bake your butternut squash or pumpkin or squash a day ahead, the stew will come together in a snap.


Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole

You can do fabulous things with pumpkins aside from spooky faces and pumpkin pie… Just ask any Mexican. We have a way with pumpkins.

Native to Mexico, pumpkins have been devoured there for centuries, in their entirety. The seeds are addicting as snacks, used as a hefty base for salsas, soups and sauces and more recently sprinkled on top of many dishes. The pumpkin meat is used for soups and stews, and along with the entire rind cooked in a piloncillo syrup, becoming a traditional favorite known as Tacha.

Yet there is something else you can make with those fall pumpkins: Mole!

An easy to make, silky textured and exquisite tasting mole sauce, that can bathe anything you can think of. From chicken to meat, fish, seafood and veggies it all goes beautifully swaddled in it. I like it mostly with chicken or turkey, which is how I am most used to eating thick and rich Mole sauces….

So that you can try it too, here it goes.

As simple as it is to make, it uses two ancient and crucial techniques of Mexican cooking that enhance the flavors of the ingredients and bring a ton of personality to a dish: charring and toasting.

First the onion and garlic take a quick turn under the broiler to be charred. Their sharp, crisp and pungent flavors become transformed…

…as if their alter ego came out to show depth and sweetness. While at the same time becoming a bit rustic.

Then the ancho chiles, almonds, cinnamon, allspice and whole cloves take a turn either in a skillet or comal, to lightly toast.

Toasting them intensifies and deepens their flavor, it releases new aromas and adds a kind of warmth to the dish.

As the chiles have been dried for a long time, aside from giving them a light toast, you need to rehydrate them and plump them back to life. And it takes just 10 minutes of soaking them in a hot bath.

Then you also use that water from the chile bath, as it has some of the intense flavors and colors of the chiles, as well as the chiles to make the Mole Sauce.

Then everything in the blender goes!

If you used True or Ceylon cinnamon, puree it along with the rest of the ingredients. As it is light and thin, it crumbles and purees easily. It is gentle and kind to the blades of the blender. If you only found the hard Cassia kind, use it to simmer in the mole sauce further on.

Then you add it all along with the pumpkin puree in a big pot. You can use already made pumpkin puree from the store…

Or make your own pumpkin puree with those extra pumpkins that are sitting on your front porch… Making the puree is pretty simple: Quarter the pumpkin, remove the seeds and fibers, roast in the oven at 400 ºF until soft and process the pumpkin meat in a blender of food processor until smooth.

After you simmer the pumpkin puree along with the ancho chile puree (that has the charred and toasted ingredients), it will look like this. Incredibly rich, just like its flavor.

You can make the Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole ahead of time, and just heat it when you are ready to serve it.

Topping it with toasted pumpkin seeds makes the dish all the more fabulous. You can taste it already, right?


Top 10 Great Curry Recipes

Indian food has been on the rise within the food hall of fame from amateur chefs to gastronomic, Michelin Star restaurants throughout the world. The infinite spices, the naan, the ghee, the balti, the perfectly balanced heat versus deliciousness that even with a little cold sweat one still has many more mouthfuls a curry night never disappoints. From the Tamil word ‘Kari’, meaning ‘spiced sauce’, comes this catch-all term, used to refer to any number of hot, spicy, sauce-based dishes of east Indian origin.

The great thing about curries is that there aren’t overly complex. Just maybe a couple of trial and error but so rewarding in your kitchen. Give it a go. Here are the Top 10 Great Curries for you.

1. Coconut Red Curry Pork Burgers

Curried Pork Burgers, who has never made a delicious home-made burger before? Spice up the old habits and turn your burger into a delicious Indian coconut red curry patty. Great when served with pickled cucumber (in this recipe slaw) and red curry sauce. If you’re brave enough, make a naan it isn’t that complicated to do. Perfect as a starter and great for grilling on the barbecue. The meat can be replaced with any other meat from mouton to lamb to chicken to beef. A veggie option would be to replace the meat with chickpeas and burnt eggplant.

2. Indian Meatball Curry

Yes, we always associate meatballs with a ball of spaghetti on the side but, have you ever wondered how curried meatballs would be like. If you have a dinner party to plan for, make sure to try this recipe out. You will be the talk of the town. Little spicy and juicy masala meatballs served with curry sauce that won’t take a day in the kitchen. What’s great about this recipe is that they’re all gluten free. So more space for other things too!

3. Spicy Chicken Masala Curry

Masala now is the household name that inspired the world wherever on the globe. Nothing beats and says more than a spicy chicken masala curry. This has to be one the greatest ever dishes in the Indian cusine. This is a traditional meal you’ll find on most restaurant’s menus quick and easy to do. Sometimes you can get away with cutting corners when cooking, but in this instant, the spices you use are terribly important and no corners can be cut. If you are lucky enough to have a spiced market near you, then I strongly suggest that you have a detour. If time permits, marinate your chicken overnight.

4. Aromatic Aloo Methi Curry

Aloo is another strong household name. Literally means potatoes. You will be surprised to know that most Indians are indeed vegetarians with respect to the planet. If not, they will have one day in the week where it is simply forbidden to eat meat. Vegetarianism in Indian dates from thousands of years. It isn’t a trend, it’s their way of life. By no surprise this recipe ticks so many boxes. It’s filling, it’s super tasty. Make sure to turn your kitchen into a mini spiced specialist shop and your off to being able to cook most Indian dishes.

5. Maharashtrian Prawns Curry

Off to the western coast, where you’ll find a fabulous jhinga recipe, the Maharashtrian prawn curry. Also, a place where you will have the most coconut base food on offer. This truly is a stunning piece of food engineering from the garam masala to the turmeric, the ginger, coriander etc.…all the ingredients in one bowl enough to question you on why cook anything else. Best eaten with a side of fluffy basmati rice and naan bread.

6. Moru Kaalan With Kumbalanga – Ashgourd Yogurt Curry

Southwest this time still on the tropical Malabar Coast where you will find many seafood dishes, Kerala in the state of Kochi palm tree lined beaches and backwaters. We have here the Moru Kaallan curry with Kumbalanga, yogurt, and ashgourd curry. This curry is traditionally served with rice on the side but also great to accompany seafood grilled dishes or simply as a dip.

7. Pumpkin Coconut Curry with Indian flavors

A winter, seasonal kind of stew pumpkin curry, what else to warm one up. This dish has it all sweetness from the pumpkin, earthiness from the moong dal, and spiciness from the chilis. Once again, a coconut-based dish that marries everything up so well and is so balanced. Simple and easy to do but very rewarding. Best eaten with a mixed vegetable Indian style rice with a pinch of saffron at the last minute.

9. Spicy Brinjal Aubergine Curry

Spicy Brinjal Aubergine curry will fool anyone thinking this dish has meat in it. It’s genuinely brilliant and very meaty (without the meat). It has iron, minerals boasting huge flavors. From the aubergines to the spices, this dish has it all. Perfectly served with a Roti bread or indeed steamed basmati. It’s one of many classics from the country and for those seeking flavors above all.

9. Spicy Kielbasa, Tomato and Chili Curry

Kielbasa is one of those sausages that will make you return to for any purpose, a meal or as a snack in front of a good movie. Originally from Poland and made from both pork and beef with the likes of marjoram, cloves with smoked notes added to it – perfect for this curry recipe. What better ways to unite cultures together but through cooking? You’ll find this tomato and chili curry one of those that you’ll end up making once a week.

10. Gobi Cauliflower Masala Curry

We did say India had a wide range of vegetarian curries so let’s end on a high note. Gobi or cauliflower is perfect with this restaurant-worthy masala curry type stew recipe. Easy to do and can also be changed to an aloo recipe by swapping the cauliflower with potatoes. Perfect if you’re also making a biryani dish for your guests.


10 Creative Ways to Use Nut Butters

Spread it around: nut butters are a great way to add nutrition and flavor to plant-based recipes. And it’s not just about peanut butter, anymore. These days, you’ll find creamy butters made from almonds, cashews, pecans, walnuts, and more, as well as seed butters made with sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, and sesame seeds. There’s even soy nut butter for those with nut and seed allergies. Specialty nut butters are also popular with enticing flavor combos, such as chocolate-sunflower seed butter, chocolate-hazelnut butter, and vanilla-espresso almond butter. Nut butters are also easy and economical to make at home using a food processor or high-speed blender.

We all know how great nut butters taste slathered on our favorite bread or baked into homemade cookies. But nut butters go way beyond toast. From spicy Asian sauces to hearty African stews, here are 10 great ways to use them in your cooking. Warning: you may never buy a jar of peanut butter again.

1. In spreads & dips
Instead of the familiar tahini-based hummus, try something different like garbanzo beans blended with almond butter and a splash of Sriracha sauce. Use walnut butter to make spinach-walnut crostinis as an appetizer, or combine cashew butter with artichokes for a luscious artichoke-cashew dip.

2. In soups
Just a small amount of nut butter can add a creamy richness to soups such as a pumpkin-pecan soup with pecan butter croutons or artichoke-walnut butter bisque.

3. In sauces
Nut butters can be used in a wide variety of sauces to top vegetables, pasta, or your favorite plant-based protein. Try grilled vegetables with an almond Romesco sauce, baked tofu with a tahini sauce, penne with an avocado-cashew cream, or slather some pecan butter sauce over a baked sweet potato.

4. In salad dressings
Nut butters can turn simple salads from so-so to sensational. How about a cashew goddess dressing to top a hearty Niçoise salad or a macadamia-rum dressing to drizzle over a tropical fruit salad?

5. In smoothies
A spoonful of nut butter adds protein and flavor to your morning smoothie. Create refreshing and creamy treats such as a cashew-pineapple smoothie or maybe an almond butter-banana shake.

6. In main dishes
The sky’s the limit when it comes to using nut butters in your main dish meals, from a vegetable-cashew korma or tropical chickpea-Brazil nut stew to a satisfying chestnut vegetable pot pie.

7. At breakfast
Start the day with a little help from your nut butter friends: swirl some almond butter or walnut butter into your morning oatmeal or add nut butter to a batch of muffins. On the weekend, treat yourself to some maple-pecan butter waffles with pecan maple syrup or a stack of apple-almond butter pancakes.

8. In desserts
Sure, we all know about peanut butter cookies and peanut butter pie, but other nut butters can also do dessert deliciously. Make a simple pecan butter topping for ice cream or a dazzling chocolate-almond butter cheesecake. Or whip up a batch of chocolate-cashew mousse, make an apple-walnut butter crumble, or swirl your favorite nut butter into a batch of brownie batter for added decadence.

9. In dairy alternatives
Cashew butter, with its mild flavor, is perhaps the most versatile of all the nut butters. Use it to make vegan cream cheese, sour cream, and mayonnaise.

10. And, of course, in sandwiches
Move beyond the classic PB&J with winning sandwich options such as roasted eggplant pita with garlicky lemon-walnut sauce, peach-almond butter quesadillas, or Thai tofu-vegetable wraps with a hazelnut drizzle.

Best-selling author Robin Robertson has written more than 20 cookbooks, including Vegan Planet, More Quick-Fix Vegan, and Nut Butter Cookbook.

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