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What to Drink to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse (Slideshow)

What to Drink to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse (Slideshow)

Bottled Water

Whether it’s Aquafina, Dasani, Smartwater, or Poland Springs, get your hands on any and all bottled water you can. There’s no telling how many zombies fell into reservoirs, lakes, streams, and even oceans and may have contaminated previously viable drinking water.

Rain Water

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You have to stay hydrated if you’re spending all your time fighting off zombies. Go to an area that is high up (the top of a hill, mountain, building, ANYTHING!) and set up a large tarp that is void of holes. Collect your rain water as frequently as you can and store it in bottles so that you can drink it when supplies are low or there is a drought. Remember, rain water is OK to drink without sanitizing it.

Juice

We’re not talking about bottled juice here. We mean actual juice that has been squeezed out of a piece of fruit. Oranges, pineapples, lemons, and limes are all exceptional sources of vitamin c, hydration, and energy. We know that you won’t have a juicer when you’re surrounded by millions of flesh-feasting killers, but you have a knife (we hope) and all you have to do to quench your thirst is slice the orange in half and squeeze!

Coconut Water

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Again, this isn’t the bottled stuff, because you probably don’t have access to that (but if you do have access, stock up!), but the zombie apocalypse means that the entire world is going to be covered in the walking dead and that includes islands and warm-weather places. But if you were lucky enough to get stranded on your honeymoon when the zombie takeover hit, you have access to coconuts and all their hydration benefits. Crack open a coconut and start drinking the juice!

Beer

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If you’re down to the wire and you’re in need of nutrients and hydration with no water in sight, then beer is your viable final option. As beer is mostly water, humans have been drinking beer for centuries to survive and it can even fight off infection due to the alcohol content. Remember, drinking beer will eventually dehydrate you and make you even thirstier. And we’re not sure how much of a good idea it is to be fighting zombies while you’re wasted, but hey, it might make you less terrified!


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.


Learn to Survive a Zombie Apocalypse at This Booze-Fueled Summer Camp for Grown-Ups

On June 28 in Pittsboro, N.C., Wild Yonder launches the first summer session of its food-centric camp for grown-ups—or as its founders call it, “summer camp with cocktails.” Wild Yonder launched this spring, run by a trio of rising-star North Carolinians: event planner Heather Cook, architect Meredith Pittman, and a Food & Wine vet, writer and editor Kaitlyn Goalen.

Partly fueled by summer-camp nostalgia, the three women also seek to spotlight the thriving foodways of their state. For the upcoming one-day session, “Survival of the Wildest,” camp counselors include star North Carolina chef Ashley Christensen, who will lead a discussion about food and community while hosting the cocktail hour. Local musician and outdoorsman Stephen Mullaney will lead a course on how to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Here, Goalen talks about founding Wild Yonder, the camp experience and goals.

Heather, Meredith and I have been friends for a long time. In the summer of 2013, were reminiscing over beers and fried chicken at a bar, and this idea just came out. We were motivated to make it a reality by all that’s going on in the Triangle Region. There’s so much growth going on, so many young entrepreneurs starting so many exciting projects, but it’s not as nationally recognized as it deserves. A lot of the entrepreneurs are friends of ours. We saw the opportunity to create something that celebrates that, and how freaking gorgeous it is here.

We don’t consider this “glamping” in any way. You get dirty. It’s not superficial. But it’s meant to be fun and relaxing. We’re not trying to push people that far out of their comfort zone.

Music is also important to us. The Triangle area has some unbelievably talented people doing really cool stuff. We end every camp with a campfire, led by a local musician. In June it will be Phil Cook of Megafaun, who’s also Heather’s husband. In the future we may do an entirely music-themed camp.

I can’t wait for the zombie apocalypse class. Stephen is the type of guy who can survive in the woods for two weeks with a nail file and a book of matches. He’s going to show us things like what you should take first if you have to pillage someone’s house. (It’s nail polish, because you can use it to quickly start a fire.)

Two sources of huge inspiration for us were El Cosmico in Marfa, Texas, and Camp Wandawega in Wisconsin. The Camp Wandawega folks have been incredibly generous with their experiences.

Our ultimate goal is to have a permanent space in the woods. These day camps are pilot projects for us to figure out what works. We didn’t have any start-up funds to buy a big piece of land. So while we write the business plan and court investors, we decided to build the brand and get people excited about it. We’re looking at a bunch of sites, all within an hour’s drive of the Research Triangle. The idea is to have a variety of options, whether you want to camp out with your own gear or stay the night in a teepee or a bunkhouse, host a wedding or hold a corporate retreat. We’ll offer à la carte visits, and some weekends we’ll offer themed packages. We’re not hyper-local: In the future we plan to bring in folks from outside the state. One thing I can say for sure, if I can make a living running a summer camp for grown-ups that has cocktails, I’ll be the happiest person on the planet.