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Charleston: Shaken and Stirred

Charleston: Shaken and Stirred

“We’re a bunch of Whiskeypalians.”

My guide, John Laverne of Bulldog Tours, shared this clever portmanteau that winks at Charleston’s pious past. Then, and now, Charlestonians also bow down to their booze.

Up until a decade ago, South Carolina was famous for being the state with the stiffest drinks. State law required bartenders to use mini bottles, like those used on airplanes, for mixed drinks. Measuring 1.7 ounces, those bottles had more booze than the average 1 to1¼-ounce shot poured across America. However, the law also left bartenders with a limited liquor selection, since mixers, like amaro, and small batch distillers only come in full 750-millileter bottles.

Now, Charleston is in full cocktail swing. Bartenders have mastered the free pour, the nation’s mixology trend is well-suited to the city’s culinary scene, and local bar talents, like Brooks Reitz of Jack Rudy Cocktail Co., are creating artisanal mixers. Here are my three choice spots to tipple:

Belmont
For a dapper drink, slip into this intimate lounge situated away from downtown’s bustle. Mickey Moran’s beverage boîte oozes cool with dim lighting, black and white movies, and mixologists sporting skinny ties embroidered with “B.” Come for the skillfully-stirred cocktails like the Aldo Raine: rye, zucca, aperol, lemon juice, and apple bitters. Stay for the best amaro selection in town — a welcome digestivo after a hearty Lowcountry meal. The genial staff are eager to suggest a drink or recommend their favorite local haunts. What is the Belmont’s local stamp of approval? The bar is an industry hangout for fellow food and beverage folk when they finish their shifts.

Edmund’s Oast
Known for their 48 taps of beer on the wall, this contemporary brewpub has the cleverest cocktails in town. Grab a seat at the gorgeous bar, an expansive 24-seater that encourages interactive drinking. Jayce McConnell, 2013 Eater Young Gun winner, leads a stellar batch of young bartenders. Drink up Southern history with Savannah’s boozy Chatham Artillery punch or a Velvet Ditch (named for Oxford, Mississippi’s tendency to trap visitors), a tasty blend of rhum agricole, Cynar, Montenegro, lemon juice, and grapefruit bitters. Save room for chef Andy Henderson’s delicious fare, which pairs perfectly with the balanced drinks.

Gin Joint
What this cocktail emporium lacks in size, it makes up in sprits, as it boasts a well-curated selection along the corner bar. Jars of fresh herbs — mint, basil, rosemary, oh my! — hint at the seasonality and TLC that goes into each drink. Go for the Bartender’s Choice: a bespoke beverage based on two adjectives; my “herbal” and “vegetal” order gets me a cilantro, cucumber, and tequila refresher. The small plates menu offers gourmet snacks, like pad Thai popcorn and housemade beef jerky. Along with his wife, owner Joe Raya makes Bittermilk: handmade bottled cocktails, and Tippleman’s “not quite so simple” syrups (to be released later this summer).


Here's When to Shake a Cocktail and When to Stir One

Some cocktails benefit from a vigorous shake. Others prefer a swift stir. And still others just want to chillax on some rocks. Here&aposs the low-down on when to do what to which cocktail.

Why stir a cocktail? A couple reasons.

1. You want a cocktail that&aposs clear as an alpine stream.

For see-through clarity, stir a martini or manhattan. A stirred martini has a very soft, silky texture. Shaking aerates the cocktail, which changes the texture, makes it a bit frothy. Some people like that, some don&apost.

2. You want the least amount of dilution possible.

Shaking will draw a bit more water off the ice than stirring. Put another way, stirring can give you a stiffer drink.

Why shake a cocktail? Again, two reasons.

1. To get a super-cold cocktail.

Shaking is good for drinks served up (without ice). A shaken martini has icy snap and a good crisp bite. Also, if you&aposre serving a cocktail over ice and want to start with a very cold drink, shake it first, and then strain it over fresh ice. All you need are about 15 or 20 good shakes.

  • Cocktails with egg whites need to be shaken. Drinks with citrus juice are also good candidates. AGin Fizzalways needs to be shaken to incorporate the egg whites into cream and citrus juice -- and it requires a little extra elbow grease to mix it right.

Which is colder, a stirred cocktail or a shaken cocktail?

A shaken cocktail. The strange truth is, you can actually shake a cocktail to below 0 ଌ (between -5 to -7 ଌ).

Will shaking longer make it colder?

No. After about 20 vigorous shakes, the temperature plateaus. Any shaking after that is called exercise.

Why doesn't it get colder?

Because science. It&aposs complicated. This article explains it.

How long do I need to stir a cocktail to make it ice cold?

What takes 10 seconds with a shaker, requires a couple minutes of constant stirring.

Pro-tip for colder stirred drinks: Start out with a chilled stirring pitcher or pint glass. Then your ice won&apost have to work to cool down the pitcher as well as the liquid.

Does the type of ice matter?

Not really. But use lots of ice so there&aposs a lot of surface area exposed.


Will the Real Irish Coffee Please Stand Up

If you like Irish Coffees, and the picture to the left looks familiar, then you can empathize with me on this very crucial topic. Too often when ordering an Irish Coffee this is similar to what might be served. Far too many restaurants and bartenders take the liberty of bastardizing a perfectly created libation.

The original Irish Coffee was introduced to the world in the early 1940’s by Joseph Sheridan, the head chef at Foynes, County Limerick. Foynes was the last port of call on the eastern shore of the Atlantic for flying boats. On a blustery night one of the flying boats filled with American passengers had to turn around shortly after take off and return to the port. Trying to ease the cold of winter and settle the nerves of the American travelers, Sheridan thought to add a little Irish Whiskey to the coffee. After being asked if it was Brazilian Coffee they were being served, Sheridan exclaimed it was IRISH COFFEE!

There were a couple of claims, as with any concoction, as to who was responsible for bringing the drink to America. The first bar with any real connection to the drink was Tom Bergin’s Tavern in Los Angeles. Since the early 1950’s the tavern has hung a large sign reading ‘House of Irish Coffee.’

Original and accurate recipe:

Caife Gaelach</strong></p> <p>2 Parts J. Jameson Irish Whiskey</p> <p>2 Parts Fresh Cream (un-whipped)</p> <p><ul> <li>In an Irish Coffee glass add the black coffee and sugar, stir until the sugar is dissolved. The sugar is essential in making the cream float.</li> <li>Add Irish Whiskey</p></ul>

*Dragon Fruit and Pink Peppercorn Syrup

Ingredients:

  • .25 cup Pink Peppercorns
  • 1 Whole Dragon Fruit, Blended
  • .5 quart Sugar
  • .5 quart Water

Preparation: Add all ingredients to a saucepan and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes until incorporated. Strain and use.


RULES & GUIDELINES

This competition is open to movers & shakers, bartenders that are working in great bars, restaurants, lounges, hotels, clubs & more in the US. Original recipes must include minimum of 1.5 ounce of either Wódka or Harleston Green Scotch. House made ingredients are allowed, we do encourage creativity, ‘thinking outside of the box’, as well as keeping ingredients, mixers & or modifiers to 4-5 limit, to encourage skill, taste, appearance, complimenting Wódka & Harleston Green Scotch, speed & consistency. (For future, for swift yet great remake in a busy bar)

All recipes will be judged according to the name of the cocktail (10 points), appearance/presentation (15 points), written inspiration (25 points), creativity (20 points) balance of flavors, aroma, and character (30 points). All recipes must include a full list of ingredients and preparation method (shaken, stirred, built etc.) instructions, as well as an image of the cocktail, as well as name of participating bartender & bar.

Deadline for entries is September 30th 2019.

Receive 5 bonus points by sharing your cocktail on Instagram and tagging either @WodkaWodkaVodka or @HarlestonScotch. You must also use the hashtag #Shaken&StirredCocktailCompetition

Receive 5 bonus points if your establishment carries either Wódka Vodka or Harleston Green Scotch

*By submitting your cocktail photos, you are giving Chilled Media and Edgewater Spirits the rights to use your photos.

This competition is open to movers & shakers, bartenders that are working in great bars, restaurants, lounges, hotels, clubs & more in the US. Original recipes must include minimum of 1.5 ounce of either Wódka or Harleston Green Scotch. House made ingredients are allowed, we do encourage creativity, ‘thinking outside of the box’, as well as keeping ingredients, mixers & or modifiers to 4-5 limit, to encourage skill, taste, appearance, complimenting Wódka & Harleston Green Scotch, speed & consistency. (For future, for swift yet great remake in a busy bar)

All recipes will be judged according to the name of the cocktail (10 points), appearance/presentation (15 points), written inspiration (25 points), creativity (20 points) balance of flavors, aroma, and character (30 points). All recipes must include a full list of ingredients and preparation method (shaken, stirred, built etc.) instructions, as well as an image of the cocktail, as well as name of participating bartender & bar.

Deadline for entries is September 30th 2019.

Receive 5 bonus points by sharing your cocktail on Instagram and tagging either @WodkaWodkaVodka or @HarlestonScotch. You must also use the hashtag #Shaken&StirredCocktailCompetition

Receive 5 bonus points if your establishment carries either Wódka Vodka or Harleston Green Scotch

*By submitting your cocktail photos, you are giving Chilled Media and Edgewater Spirits the rights to use your photos.


The Stirred Cocktail

In many modern establishments, stirring is a lost art . Everywhere you go, people seem to be shaking drinks, regardless of their contents. This is unfortunate, because a well stirred drink will have a certain texture that can’t be obtained by shaking.

That being said, there are definitely times when you’ll want to shake a drink, such as if there are any juices or dairy/egg products. However, outside of these situations, stirring is the way to go.

For more discusion on why stirring is not as popular, check out Shaken or Stirred?

Stirring a cocktail results in slower chilling of the beverage due to the more gentle gradual nature of stirring. The goal of proper stirring technique is to do the exact opposite of shaking, i.e. avoiding aerating and agitating the drink. A good stirring motion can be very fast. You are revolving the spoon around the glass resulting in the liquids and ice also revolving at a high rate. You are not sloshing the spoon around in the drink violently, disturbing the ice and introducing a lot of air into the drink.

When making multiple drinks, the downside is that stirring will often take a few seconds longer per drink to both chill and to add the appropriate water content to the final product. This results in taking slightly longer to make each cocktail. A way around this problem is to build each one in a mixing glass, add ice and let them sit in the ice while you prepare the remaining drinks, allowing each to sit in the ice for up to a minute or so before stirring. When the drinks are then stirred, it will take less active time to chill and appropriately dilute the drink.

If the drink will mix well via stirring, i.e. no juices or dairy/egg products, a stirred cocktail will have a much smoother, velvety texture , than a shaken cocktail. This is especially important for the Martini and Manhattan, among many others.

Before we dive into how to stir, we need to talk about a few pieces of equipment that will help you get started.

    • Mixing glass
    • Barspoon
    • Julip Strainer

    Mixing Glass

    Pint glasses will also work with a Boston shaker and are thus more versatile in everyday use.

    This is what you will be building and chilling your drink in. Mixing glasses range drastically in style and price, from the fancy, crystal stemmed glasses to the simple and inexpensive. While some of the more expensive glasses are beautiful and the stemmed type will keep your hands from warming the drink, a simple pint glass will work fine, especially if you are just starting out. These can typically be purchased for a couple bucks. Save the fancier glasses until you decide how serious you are about stirring drinks.

    There are many styles of barspoons , some of which are useful, while others are a waste of money. So what makes for a good barspoon? Knowing a few essential specs will give you the knowledge to find the right barspoon and avoid the duds out there. The coils on the handle make a difference in how the spoon will twist between your fingers, with tighter coils making for better stirring. The spoon end should be bent forward a little. This will help the spoon move around the base of the glass. Avoid the completely straight spoons, as they won’t stir as well.

    A great place to find high quality barspoons as well as other barware is Cocktail Kingdom.

    The higher end spoons will have weighted tips and tighter coils on the handle to help with balance and stirring. Some have muddlers. These are typically designed better than the lower end spoons. That being said I have seen and unfortunately purchased barspoons from “fancy stores” that are some of the poorest performing spoons I’ve ever seen. A “cute” or “designer” spoon may look nice on display, but fail in actual use, making stirring more difficult and thus less accessible to the beginner.

    I’ve had success with the red topped barspoons from Sur La Table (pictured above).

    Be careful with the cheaper red topped spoons. While some are actually quite good low-cost options, others have very wide coils, are unbalanced and make stirring more difficult. Compare a few before buying and you will be better informed and avoid making the mistakes I made when first buying barspoons.

    Julip Strainer

    The julip strainer is the strainer of choice for a stirred cocktail. Not a lot of variability in these, although some are available with different finishes. That being said, the type sold in most stores works quite well.

    Many folks utilize different techniques , especially once they have practiced for a while. I have found that this method of hand positioning is a great way to learn the basic motions of stirring. Eventually, you may discover that slight variations in finger positioning make you more comfortable/effective at stirring.


    Best easy cocktail recipes

    1. Horse Apple by Giuseppe González of Suffolk Arms, New York, NY

    At his newly-opened Manhattan cocktail pub, bar king Giuseppe González serves a pick-your-poison elixir that requires just an apple, horseradish and spirit. Customize the recipe with whatever booze you&rsquove got stashed at home.

    Ingredients:
    1½ oz choice of spirit
    1 freshly-juiced Granny Smith apple
    Grated horseradish

    Directions:
    Juice Granny Smith apple and combine with choice of spirit in a double rocks glass. Add ice and stir. Top with grated horseradish for garnish.

    2. Bittersweet Symphony by Jeffrey Morgenthaler of Clyde Common and Pepe Le Moko, Portland, OR

    For his take on a gin-aperitif-vermouth drink, Portland&rsquos star bartender Jeffrey Morgenthaler (Clyde Common, Pépé le Moko) layers the botanicals of Fords gin with bright orange Aperol and Punt e Mes, a bitter and sweet Italian vermouth.

    Ingredients:
    1.5 oz Ford&rsquos gin
    .75 oz Aperol
    .75 oz Punt e Mes

    Directions:
    Combine ingredients and stir with ice cubes until cold. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and gains with a lemon twist.

    3. Ginger Snap by Brett Esler of Whisler’s, Austin, TX

    Austin bartender Brett Esler spruces up the tried-and-true negroni swapping out Campari for Domaine de Canton, an elegant liqueur shot with Vietnamese baby ginger, eau de vie and cognac and a hint of orange liqueur.

    Ingredients:
    ½ oz Aviation gin
    1 oz Dolin dry vermouth
    1 oz Domaine de Canton
    1 barspoon Combier orange liqueur

    Directions:
    Add all ingredients to a mixing glass and stir for about 20 seconds or until properly chilled. Strain into an old-fashioned glass over 1 large ice cube, express and place the lemon peel as a garnish, and serve.

    4. Brandy Milk Punch by Ferrel Dugas of Commander’s Palace, New Orleans, LA

    At the landmark Commander's Palace in New Orleans&rsquo Garden District, bar chef Ferrel Dugas whips up a creamy, vanilla-laced sip that doubles as a spiked dessert. Substitute almond milk for cream for a lighter sip.

    Ingredients:
    2 ounces brandy
    1 ounce simple syrup
    1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    1 ½ ounces cream or almond milk

    Directions:
    Combine all the ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass filled with ice. Garnish with a light dusting of freshly grated nutmeg. Serve immediately.

    5. St-Germain Cocktail by Ran Duan of the Baldwin Bar, Boston, MA

    This refreshing, bubbly elixir has become a modern classic in recent years, appearing on menus across the country. Young-gun barkeep Ran Duan serves his version at Boston&rsquos Baldwin Bar, a craft cocktail bar housed within a family-owned Sichuan restaurant.

    Ingredients:
    1½ oz St-Germain elderflower liqueur
    1 oz Martini prosecco (or Champagne)
    1 oz sparkling water

    Directions:
    Build ingredients in a Collins glass. Fill with ice. Garnish with a lemon twist.

    6. Juan Lockwood by Lucinda Sterling of Middle Branch, New York, NY

    Agave fans will love this equal parts mescal-and-tequila drink, rounded out by just a splash of rich, spicy chocolate bitters.

    Ingredients:
    1½ oz Espolón Tequila Reposado
    1/2 oz Del Maguey Vida Mezcal
    Dash of chocolate bitters
    1 barspoon agave syrup

    Directions:
    Combine ingredients in a rocks glass. Stir in the glass with a double rock. Garnish with an orange twist.

    7. Tí Punch by Paul McGee of Lost Lake, Chicago, IL

    At Chicago&rsquos famed tiki haunt, barkeep Paul McGee offers his Tí Punch with a choice of nine different unaged rhum agricoles, served traditionally or with ice. This refreshing recipe highlights the rhum&rsquos grassy funk through a simple, stirred preparation.

    Ingredients:
    2 oz Rhum Agricole Blanc
    1 quarter-sized lime disc (with flesh)
    1 barspoon cane syrup

    Directions:
    In a rocks glass, squeeze the lime disc, add cane syrup and rhum. Add one large ice cube and stir for five seconds.

    8. Far and Away by Gregory Westcott of Hinoki & the Bird in Los Angeles, CA

    At this Japanese-inflected American eatery in L.A., veteran beverage director Gregory Westcott shakes a fun and fruity sip with muddled strawberries, lemon and almond milk. That makes it healthy right?

    Ingredients:
    1 strawberry
    ¾ oz vanilla almond milk
    ¾ oz lemon juice
    2 oz bourbon

    Directions:
    Slice the strawberry from top to bottom. Save one slice for garnish. Muddle remaining strawberry. Shake vanilla almond milk, lemon juice and bourbon with ice cubes for 12 seconds. Pour over new ice. Add strawberry garnish and cracked black pepper.

    9. Kirkland Whisky Smash by Carl York of The Kirkland Tap & Trotter, Somerville, MA

    In addition to grub from a James Beard-recognized chef and a selection of craft suds, this New American eatery offers a number of house quaffs such as this grill-ready summertime whiskey smash prepared in a blender. Customize the drink with any spirit, and make sure to add enough liquid to make sure the lemons are blended properly.

    Ingredients:
    2 oz choice of spirit
    1 small lemon
    1 teaspoon sugar
    Mint leaves
    Pinch of salt

    Directions:
    Combine ingredients in blender and blend. Strain and serve over crushed ice. Garnish with a mint sprig.

    10. Drunken Earl by Maureen Donegan of Presidio Social Club, San Francisco, CA

    Turn up traditional afternoon tea with this boozy Earl Grey recipe, fortified with rye and Drambuie, a refined, Scotch-based liqueur.

    Ingredients:
    1 oz Wild Turkey Rye
    1 oz Drambuie
    1 Earl Grey tea bag

    Directions:
    Preheat a footed mug. Add rye, Drambuie and tea bag. Fill with hot water. Serve with a small plate and teaspoon so the tea bag may be removed. Cream is optional.

    11. East & Tonic Reimagined by Mara Urushido of Saxon + Parole and Madame Geneva, New York, NY

    The basic gin & tonic gets an Asian-inflected twist courtesy of New York&rsquos Mara Urushido. At Saxon + Parole in NoHo, the bar man plays on the gin&rsquos natural spices with added fresh garnishes including a stem of fragrant lemongrass.

    Ingredients:
    1½ oz Bombay Sapphire East gin
    3 oz Fevertree tonic
    Lime wedge
    Lemongrass stem
    Option fresh garnish (juniper berries, coriander, lemongrass)

    Directions:
    Press lemongrass stem and lime wedge into base of a stemmed balloon glass. Add gin and tonic. Fill with ice and build additional fresh garnish on top.

    12. Law Abiding Citizen by Ryan Gannon of Cure, New Orleans, LA

    Created for a cocktail competition in 2014, this recipe by Cure's Ryan Gannon won the judges over with a simple but thoughtful blend of tart pomegranate liqueur and an exceedingly complex, fruity amontillado sherry.

    Ingredients:
    ¾ oz PAMA Pomegranate Liqueur
    1 ½ oz Hidalgo Napoleon Amontillado Sherry
    ¾ oz lemon juice
    ¼ oz simple syrup

    Directions:
    Shake ingredients with ice. Double strain and serve up in a coupe glass.

    13. Morning Buzz by Pamela Wiznitzer of Seamstress, Belle Shoals and Trademark Taste & Grind, New York, NY

    Put that Jägermeister in your cupboard to good use with this boozy pick-me-up created by bar maven Pam Wiznitzer and served at her newly opened café-bar hybrid Trademark Taste & Grind.

    Ingredients:
    .5 oz Jägermeister spice
    1.5 oz Tin Cup Whiskey
    2 oz coffee
    .75 oz orgeat

    Directions:
    Shake with ice, strain and serve in a Collins glass.

    14. Café Racer by Luke Andrews of the Whistler, Chicago, IL

    Bartender Luke Andrews riffs on the classic, Campari-based Americano cocktail by employing two types of vermouth along with a splash of orange liqueur.

    Ingredients:
    ½ oz Carpano Antica
    ½ oz Punt E Mes
    ¾ oz Campari
    ¼ Combier

    Directions:
    Combine ingredients in a highball glass. Top off with soda water and garnish with an orange peel.

    15. Brugal Mule by Nico Szymanski of Mr. Purple, New York, NY

    At this newly-opened, 15th-floor terrace gastropub, bar man Nico Szymanski swaps cask-aged rum into a traditional Moscow Mule recipe.

    Ingredients:
    2 oz Brugal Añejo rum
    ½ oz fresh lime juice
    ¼ oz simple syrup
    3 oz ginger beer

    Directions:
    Shake rum, lime and simple syrup with ice and strain into a Collins glass over new ice. Top with ginger beer and garnish with a lime wedge.


    Charleston: Shaken and Stirred - Recipes

    Do you think this would work as a martini chicken dish if I deglazed with some gin or would that clash?

    Hey Chef John, I know you do this in some of your videos, but do you think you could go over some of the equipment that you use? Maybe show us the kind of knives you use and cookware and anything else you might have?

    Great recipe! Although I made it with a chicken thighs. Have a feeling that it's even better than breasts :)

    Hi Chef John, I love this combination, am going to be trying this and the asparagus tart, on different night, but would they go together? If not what sides would you suggest? Oh and will skinless breasts do? TIA

    my favorite recipe from your site contains chicken with olives:

    fond! thanks for the great recipe.

    I always called the deliciousness on the bottom of the pan, "the fond", but I am not sure if that's actually what it is called. It may also be referred to as "flavour".

    I'm actually living very close to Kalamata so its nice to see something like this pass by!

    By the way John, do you know that your background-piano-tune is being used in a Greek radio advertisement for risotto rice? (agrino.com). lol.

    We harvest olives (for personal use) each year and it may be good to mention that they are not always stored in a brine. In the US they probably are since they keep longer that way, but within Europe these can be found also in oil. In which case you will definitely have to add extra salt to this dish.

    Angela, I think they be fine together! Otherwise I can't pick sides, since I don't know what you like. Any standard chicken sides will work!

    Kenny, that sounds terrible to me )

    This looks awesome. I've substituted green olives in place of capers for Chicken Piccata before and it was good. This recipe is more elegant.

    Hi Chef John, love your videos! Keep 'em coming! Could you tell me why you would want to use certain pans over others? For example, why use stainless steel for this recipe vs a enamelled iron pan? Or does it matter? I'm always wondering this in your videos why you use one over the other.

    Hi Chef John, love your videos! Keep 'em coming! Could you tell me why you would want to use certain pans over others? For example, why use stainless steel for this recipe vs a enamelled iron pan? Or does it matter? I'm always wondering this in your videos why you use one over the other.

    Enameled cast iron is denser than stainless steel, which means it takes longer to heat up and cool down.

    Stainless steel is preferred in recipes where quick heat control is desired, like this one. You can quickly adjust the temperature of the pan from high (when searing the chicken) to low (reducing the sauce).

    But really it doesn't matter, use whatever you're most comfortable with. As long as you're paying attention to your food it'll turn out great!

    I love good olives, good pan sauce and nearly all meat. So this is looking good. My first thought was if I want boneless skin on breasts I will have to do it myself! Then I read Kir's comment about thighs and I'm thinking, oh yeah. Bone in thighs. Ayep. But if I'm parting out a chicken this could be an excellent use for breast as they are so low in fat it is challenging to find a good treatment for them.

    Oh, and I think the words you are looking for are fond (for the good stuff in the pan) and deglazing (for pulling said good stuff into the sauce.)

    These are my favorite recipes! The simple, easy and delicious dinners. I will definitely be making this soon! I also love that you started leaving in the quiet background noise of the cooking in the video. I'm pretty sure that's new!

    Your video recipe for Chicken D'Annedolini (spelling) featured chicken and olives and was fantastic.

    This must happen this week!

    Chicken and olives, two of my favourite things together. Now I am grumpy that I am going away for a week and can't try this until I get back.

    In response to an earlier comment

    "This allows the cook to scrape the dark spots from the bottom of the pan and dissolve them, incorporating the remaining browned material at the bottom of the pan into a basic sauce.[2] The culinary term fond, French for "base" or "foundation", refers to this sauce, although it is also sometimes used to describe the browned food bits instead (commonly in the United States)."

    Now if this ever comes up on Jeopardy, you'll have a better chance of getting the question right.

    Awesome! I made this tonight for my family and it was a smash hit. Love the intense olive flavors. Not sure that I could discern the Herbs de Provence through that, but it didn't matter, as I just wanted to lick the plate, the bowl, the pan, and the knives :)

    I made your Chicken & Olive last night. The recipe looked and sounded tantalizing so I decided to try it! WOW! I never would have thought Chicken & Olives would pair as well as they do. Outstanding chicken dish! Everyone, try this as recipe as Chef John presents it before you feel the need to “put your own spin” on it. Great Job Chef John!

    Guess what I'm having Tues. for supper (it's my turn to cook)? Can't wait to try the olives w/ chicken.

    I live in a priory with other men. What would you serve as a side in addition to the salad?

    Hey John
    We made this tonight and found that is was a bit salty, If I make it again I'd omit the salt on the chicken and rinse the olives.

    I've made this several times. DELICIOUS!

    Made this last night and everyone really enjoyed it. This was a good way to use some of the miscellaneous olives that accumulated during the holidays and a really nice way to do something fun with boring old boneless chicken breasts.

    this turned out amazing! had a very elegant feel - i paired with angel hair pasta.

    i'm a huge fan - keep up the good cooking!

    Chef John! Thank you for this. just made it today and it rocked my saturday dinner! i have one humble request, would it be at all possible to know the knife you used when cutting the olives? it looks beautiful and seems like just what i need! thank you as always sir!

    We just tried this dish for the second time, this time for a visiting friend. And, it was a hit, once again. The umami of the chicken combined with piquancy of the olives is great mix.

    Thanks for the most excellent YT channel. We love your delivery, the lighting, and of course, the food!

    My boyfriend is from Morocco and this is the second time I have made the dish. I sliced a couple of preserved lemons on top for the look and I just say thank you very much for the recipe. Is very delicious. I've tried so many of your recipes and they are all delicious


    10 Superb Shaken Cocktails

    In this week&rsquos video from Panna, mixologist extraordinaire Jim Meehan demonstrates theright way to shake a cocktail. Practice your technique with these bright and boozy shaken drinks.

    In this week’s video from Panna, mixologist extraordinaire Jim Meehan demonstrates the right way to shake a cocktail. Practice your technique with these bright and boozy shaken drinks.

    1. Daiquiri
    This classic drink is made with just three ingredients: white rum, fresh lime juice and simple syrup.

    2. Bee’s Knees
    Simple, clean and refreshing, this honey-sweetened Prohibition-era cocktail is like a winter toddy that’s been given a spring makeover.

    3. The Palomaesque Cocktail
    The Paloma is a classic Mexican cocktail made with lime juice, tequila and grapefruit soda. This version is made with smoky mezcal, fresh grapefruit juice and Cocchi Americano.

    4. Southern Exposure
    This riff on a Southside includes crisp celery for a bright, vegetal flavor.

    5. Strega-Nator
    Strega, a saffron-colored Sicilian liqueur infused with 70-odd herbs and spices, gives this cocktail a brilliant color and delicious, herbaceous flavor.

    6. Philadelphia Fish House Punch
    Cocktail historians trace this cocktail back to 1732, when Philadelphia’s Schuylkill Fishing Club began every meeting with this potent drink.

    7. Division Bell
    This smoky-bittersweet cocktail is a delicious new way to drink mezcal.

    8. Bitter Queen
    The perfect drink for Campari lovers who are tired of negronis, this cocktail is made with Campari, vodka and limoncello.

    9. Chartreuse Gin Daisy
    Instead of the usual grenadine, this take on a Gin Daisy calls for spicy, herbal yellow Chartreuse.

    10. Châtelaine
    This wine-tail is made with white wine, pomegranate juice, gin and floral St-Germain.


    Madeira Gravy

    For the stock:
    (Yields 2½ quarts)
    4 Tbs. olive oil, divided
    3 lbs. turkey necks, drumsticks, or wings
    2 cups peeled and chopped carrots
    4 cups chopped yellow onions
    2 cups chopped celery
    1 cup chopped shallots
    1 cup chopped cremini mushrooms
    1 cup chopped maitake mushrooms
    1⅓ cups good-quality Madeira
    4 sprigs thyme
    2 sprigs sage
    1 sprig rosemary
    5 qts. plus 2 cups water, divided

    For the gravy:
    (Serves 8)
    1 qt. stock
    10 Tbs. unsalted butter, diced and kept cold, divided
    3/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1 cup good-quality Madeira
    Fine sea salt and freshly ground white pepper, to taste

    For the stock:

    Place an oven rack in middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 425°F.

    Rub the turkey parts in two tablespoons of the olive oil. Arrange them in a single layer in a roasting pan and roast until brown and crisp, about three hours.
    Heat the remaining two tablespoons of olive oil in a large heavy-bottomed stockpot over medium heat. Add the carrots and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes, until golden brown. Add the onions and cook, stirring occasionally, for an additional 10 minutes, until golden brown. Add the celery and cook, stirring occasionally, about eight minutes, until golden brown. Add the shallots and mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes, until golden brown.

    Add the Madeira, scraping the bottom of the stockpot to release any browned bits, and simmer for five minutes to burn off the alcohol.

    Add the roasted turkey bones to the stockpot. Add two cups of water to the roasting pan, scrape the bottom to release the browned bits, and add them and the water to the stockpot. Add the five quarts of water and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low and simmer the stock uncovered for about three hours, until rich in flavor.

    Strain the stock through a fine mesh sieve. Discard the bones and vegetables. You should have 2½ quarts of stock. Cool to room temperature. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. The fat will rise to the top as it chills.

    For the gravy:

    Skim the fat off the top of the stock. Transfer one quart of stock to a heavy-bottomed medium saucepan and bring to a simmer over low heat. Turn the heat off, cover the saucepan, and leave it on the stove.

    In a separate saucepan, heat six tablespoons of the butter over medium heat. Add the flour and stir with a whisk to form a thick, smooth paste. Cook, stirring constantly, for about eight minutes, until golden brown. Stir in the Madeira and cook, stirring constantly, for five minutes to burn off the alcohol.

    Pour in the warm stock and vigorously whisk until it is incorporated. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until a sauce consistency is achieved, 20 to 25 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in the remaining four tablespoons of cold butter one piece at a time. Strain through a fine mesh sieve. Add more stock if too thick. Serve.

    Note: The remaining stock can be refrigerated for three days or frozen in a tightly covered container for up to three months.


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