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Chefs at Home: The Sussman Brothers Slideshow

Chefs at Home: The Sussman Brothers Slideshow

Jessica Chou

Max (left) and Eli Sussman in their Brooklyn kitchen, where they sometimes cook together and presumably worked on their cookbook. Since the brothers work opposite hours (Max works brunch at Roberta's, while Eli works dinner service on the weekends), the two rarely clash. "We hang out sometimes on our days off all day and eat at places, but for the most part we aren't really in each other's space," Max said.

Jessica Chou

Max (left) and Eli Sussman in their Brooklyn kitchen, where they sometimes cook together and presumably worked on their cookbook. "We hang out sometimes on our days off all day and eat at places, but for the most part we aren't really in each other's space," Max said.

Jessica Chou

The brothers' amazing dining table (with the chess set on it) is actually a picnic table, built by a guy in Long Island they found on Craigslist. "It's a great work place where Max and I can sit together and write menus or do ordering or write a food column and not be all over each other while still being able to bounce around ideas," Eli said.

Jessica Chou

The dining table in the background can easily seat 10 people, perfect for a dinner party. "We were lucky enough to find an apartment with a good open space room so it was crucial we had a really big table that would work for us to have friends over to just hang out or for dinners," Eli said.

Jessica Chou

Max brought Murphy, a four-year-old mutt, back after working at a fishing resort in Chilean Patagonia. "He was a little puppy following me back from the village that had Internet access. So it would be a long walk and I started feeding him and he basically became my dog hanging around the resort," Max said.

Jessica Chou

The Sussman brothers have more than 60 cookbooks, with standard ones from Eleven Madison Park, Ad Hoc, and more, all of which the brothers pick up for inspiration. "I just bought Whole Beast Butchery by Ryan Farr the other day so I've been really into that one recently," Eli said. "Max just bought a really cool one that's about state fairs. Really old-school cookbook with no pictures. It's more of a history book to see what people were cooking at all these famous state and county fairs."

Jessica Chou

The first of a bunch of family memorabilia in the apartment: a family photo from when they were kids. "We call that our Godfather wedding photo. It's at our aunt's wedding and we are standing on our grandparents lawn," Eli said, "and we are just mafia'ed out in these awesome dark suits with loud ties."

Jessica Chou

The brothers' kitchen is small, but open, with pots and pans in the cupboards next to the oven and a wide counter to prep and eat at.

Jessica Chou

"We keep tongs hanging on the oven door handle and then we've got some bain-maries holding all the other tools — spatulas, whisks," Max said. "And then we've got this awesome new Wüsthof knife block that holds all our home kitchen knives."

Jessica Chou

The brothers' cousin, Eitan, made these unique cutting boards for the two as a thank you gift for catering his wedding. "He would describe himself as an amateur woodworker but honestly, he has a pretty intense operation out of his garage in downtown Detroit," Max wrote. "He's made other things than boards, like the bed for him and his wife (and we're trying to convince him to make us a coffee table, too). It's just a laborious old-school process."

Jessica Chou

On top of their cupboards, the brothers display an All-Rap Spectacular poster from 1986. "We love Run DMC and the Beastie Boys and they are a huge part of our childhood," Eli wrote. "We grew up at this camp where Beasties and DMC were always blasting. So it's up as a sort of nostalgic reminder but also it's just badass. I mean that concert must have been insane. LL COOL J has third billing... that's absurd."

The Velvet peanut butter from Detroit, however, was a gift from their mother, who sends little care packages to the brothers. "My mom loves to send little packages like we are at summer camp filled with Detroit stuff and she'll usually make a print for us (she's an artist) which we'll put up on the fridge," Eli wrote.

Jessica Chou

Normally, the brothers' couch is placed against the wall to open up the living space. When they decide to watch some TV, however, they move the couch against the dining table to watch a projection on the opposite wall.

Jessica Chou

Eli has recently taken to collecting photos, so the first photo on the left (taken by Mark Menjivar) is from 20x200, a website specializing in affordable art prints. "The photo just really grabbed me and I had to have it," Eli wrote. "The two smaller ones were birthday gifts from my dad." The latter two are signed J Brooks.

Jessica Chou

Another Detroit photo from the Sussmans' father is on display atop an Ulysses book. "You're probably sensing a trend here... I have started to collect photographs so it's been sort of a birthday gift trend as of late," Eli wrote.

Jessica Chou

The brothers worked on their second cookbook (now available online and in stores) for about a year, testing every recipe in-between their normal jobs. "It's amazing to have another person who cooks professionally who is your brother," Eli wrote, "so you know you can trust to tell them anything and it's going to stay in the room if need be."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


How to Throw a Barbecue Like Eli and Max Sussman

During a chef residency in the Hamptons, Eli and Max Sussman host a barbecue that's as fun as a summer-camp cookout.

It was a perfect July afternoon, and the chefs Eli and Max Sussman were facing off in a heated round of Ping-Pong that suggested a long family history with the sport. The two brothers were taking a break from barbecue duty at Ruschmeyer&aposs, the hotel and restaurant in Montauk where they did a cooking residency last summer. Founded in the &apos50s at the tip of New York&aposs Long Island and stylishly revamped a few years ago, Ruschmeyer&aposs is like a summer camp for adults: Cedar cabins surround a lawn (a.k.a. The Magic Garden) dotted with grills, fire pits, hammocks and an oversize tepee. The place could be straight out of Dirty Dancing—only the crowd is a cross section of tattooed surfers and social butterflies.

Ever the hosts, the Sussman brothers were flipping paprika-spiked veggie burgers for their guests at an impromptu afternoon party. Also on the menu: a version of the Middle Eastern kebabs called kofta, made from local cod and served on a brioche hot dog bun. Iced tea spiked with cardamom and rosewater fit into the Middle Eastern theme. "It&aposs the perfect summery drink," says Eli, "with a lot of character"—just like the Sussmans themselves. They&aposve been shaking up the food world ever since they started cooking at Brooklyn&aposs Mile End deli (Eli) and Roberta&aposs (Max) and began publishing irreverent cookbooks with deadpan titles like This Is a Cookbook and Best Cookbook Ever.

Welcome to paradise, Sussman style. Ruschmeyer&aposs has become a Hamptons hot spot thanks to its playful atmosphere, gorgeous views of Fort Pond and farm-to-table philosophy𠅊n ethos the Sussmans share. The brothers&apos party in The Magic Garden turned out to be the ideal showcase for their unique take on Middle Eastern cuisine, which is on year-round display at Samesa, their stand at the Berg&aposn beer hall in Brooklyn&aposs emerging Crown Heights neighborhood.

"We used the bounty of Montauk and did a really cool menu with it, taking a Mediterranean- and Middle Eastern–themed inspiration but being superlocal with ingredients," explains Max. The duo forged direct relationships with area farmers and fishermen, who provided everything from stripers fresh off the dock to candy-colored heirloom tomatoes.

Spending the season at Ruschmeyer&aposs was a flashback for the Sussmans, who grew up going to summer camp in Three Rivers, Michigan. As adults they were hired to work in the camp kitchen, with then 22-year-old Max in charge and 20-year-old Eli as his trusty sous-chef. The culinary ideology they carved out there endures today. "The kids were used to chicken nuggets and peanut butter sandwiches," says Eli. "We tried to make real food and get them excited about it. We were baking breads, making Indian feasts, roasting chickens."

Cooking in the increasingly (and sometimes deafeningly) buzzy beach town of Montauk was a bit of a change from rural Michigan, but the experiences have their parallels. "Summer comes around, you sort of shed your city skin and can reinvent yourself out in the woods," says Eli.

For the Sussmans, great food should have the same elemental appeal, whether prepared in Brooklyn or by the beach. Explains Max, "Going out to eat shouldn&apost be superserious or intellectual—it should be fun."


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